Lyndon Johnson

In the fall of 1968, as Americans turned against the far-away war in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson desperately sought a peace agreement to stop the fighting before his war-scarred presidency was to end on January 20, 1969.
In 2000, after I helped Arianna Huffington put on the Shadow Conventions opposite the Republican and Democratic national
In short, Trump is a purveyor of apocalyptic visions that are as vulgar as his taste in home decor. And that is a new thing for American politics, at least from a major party's nominee for president.
What if "endorsement" is a political red herring? "Endorsing" suggests approval, but for a lot of us that option is closed. But, hey, we still have to choose--we must choose because democracy itself is at stake today.
Fifty years ago this month (on September 9, 1966), President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety laws that launched a great life-saving program for the American People.
“Making endorsements from the pulpit” is just shorthand for using a house of worship’s resources to aid a political campaign.
The trio had been stationed at Fort Hood, Texas, and they had just been informed they were going to Vietnam. They were given a 30-day leave before they had to embark. The G.I.'s convened the press conference to perform a bold act: they intended to refuse their orders to go fight.
After college and law school, McConnell went back to Washington as an aide to Sen. Marlow Cook, the progressive Republican
A cultish following has propelled Donald Trump to the Republican nomination. Whether it can get him to the presidency remains
It's hard to believe it, but Barack Obama today is more popular than Ronald Reagan was at this juncture in his last year of office, in 1988. But will it help Hillary Clinton secure another term for the Democrats? A look at the evidence produces a surprising finding.
The rampant Johnsonization of the Civil Rights Act, a law that was in fact achieved through the efforts of many people and in a more interesting and impressive way, has been taking place on Broadway, in Robert Schenkkan's popular play, All the Way, now being released as a film on HBO.
Watching the mad, mad, mad, mad world that is the 2016 presidential campaign, I was trying to remember a presidential campaign that was as jaw-dropping, at least in my lifetime, and easily settled on 1968.
Now it is 52 years later. Our poverty level back in 1964 was one in five families. Our poverty level today is one in five
Mississippi's current political leaders travel to the beat of a different dumber. Whenever another state does something particularly outrageous that threatens to lead it to claiming the title of worst, Mississippi can be counted on to save it by doing something worse.
This week, I sat down with Rick Shenkman to talk about the brain of the American voter, and what is firing its synapses during this extraordinary primary season.
While there are similarities between the two campaigns - namely the underdog factor, an incendiary issue and the involvement of young voters - the McCarthy campaign of 1968 still claims a much more profound impact on electoral politics not only in its less-than-one-year existence but for generations that followed.
Every four years, as the snow flies, politicians who would be President come storming into caucuses, with reporters in their wake. And it can be hard work. Covering nominating conventions entailed four long concentrated days.
The last truly successful "brokered convention" - where party elders literally met in a smoke-filed hotel room to break a
A Republican Party that rejects Donald Trump after he had led the entire field by substantial margins for almost a year could stimulate a seismic political revolt leading to a third party campaign. Trumpites would legitimately complain that the nomination had been stolen from him.