Macintosh

Some people take white privilege as a moral accusation against them.
Apple's announcement drew a cheer from the crowd at a conference Monday.
I've also received many requests for more learnings from my time on Apple's PR team. Rather than respond one-on-one, I thought I'd pay tribute to Steve Jobs and his famous keynote line "one more thing..." and offer up one or two more.
On November 23, 1995, the ABC News overnight program World News Now, where I was a broadcast producer, was the first to stream television live over the internet.
People often forget that the original iPhone shipped sans its iconic app store. That's right, before "there was an app for that", there weren't any contemporary apps at all.
Steve Jobs, which I've seen three times now, is a curious and entertaining film. Until recently seen as a top Oscar favorite, it's also proved to be a shocking box office bomb, falling away to virtually nothing just now after only its third weekend in general release.
This is a dark portrait of a profoundly psychologically damaged man whose compensation for feeling unwanted as an infant was to crush everyone around him into admiring his brilliance. But at what price?
I understand creative license and why films need to condense, simplify, fudge, and invent to create drama, but is there a point where this can be considered excessively dishonest?
Alex Gibney is befuddled by why average people would mourn the death of Steve Jobs, someone they'd never met who Gibney sees mostly as a jerk who ran an electronics company. But to see Jobs as only that not only misunderstands the man, but the world we live in today.
As I saw what others were producing with Aldus PageMaker on the Macintosh, (followed quickly by the Windows version), I saw