Magna Carta

Police arrested the unnamed suspect as he fled England's Salisbury Cathedral.
The war in the Middle East is reminding us of the Holy Wars that began there in 1095, except with the crusading Christians unsuccessfully invading the Muslims for two centuries, with the prize being control of Jerusalem.
The media has spared no details when it comes to its coverage of the Mumbai meat ban. Naturally, it's a juicy topic. But more pertinent issues that have been percolating over time have not received their due attention.
Any social contract, including a digital one, should include checks and balances from society, and include some control of the reigning powers, whatever form they currently take.
No matter how deeply Muslims and Catholics have been hurt, we should be reassured that most have the character to accept this as the cost of respecting individual rights.
Why the heightened interest here in the U.S. when even Britain's greatest explorer of history -- Shakespeare, of course -- failed to even mention the Magna Carta in his 1596 play King John?
Today, Magna Carta is regarded in both the UK and the US as a foundation stone of our freedoms. Next year marks its 800th anniversary, and to celebrate, Lincoln Cathedral in eastern England has sent its copy on a grand tour of the United States. From now until January, it will be exhibited at the Library of Congress.
The Internet has thrived by the collective empowerment of capable, public-spirited people: initially, from the technical community and academia, and more recently, also the private sector in general, civil society and governments. We need a system of Internet governance that allows each community to bring its particular strengths to the common table, but allows none of them to elevate its own interests above the public good. The principles of human rights on the net are new and not universally accepted. The web becomes ever more exciting with advancing technology, but 60 percent of the population still can't use the web at all. As the web is giving people greater and greater power individually and collectively, so many forces are abusing or threaten to abuse the net and its citizens.