mahinda Rajapaksa

Having been in the Washington D.C. area for a fair amount of time and having read a few of the really good contributions
It's true that, earlier in his career, Rajapaksa appeared to be a champion of human rights and social justice; he even advocated
Here's a paragraph from the article: Here's Perera's next paragraph: Unfortunately in the past several months, the government
Sri Lankan police have recently uncovered ammunition, a suicide vest, and explosives in Chavakachcheri, a town in the country's
Could Gotabaya Rajapaksa, Sri Lanka's former defense secretary (and brother of previous president Mahinda Rajapaksa), bring the Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) together?
Last year proved to be an unpredictable year for Sri Lankan politics. Mahinda Rajapaksa, the man who ended the country's civil war in 2009 was booted out of office by an unanticipated challenger, Maithripala Sirisena.
Last week was historic for the island nation of Sri Lanka, as the electorate repeated the "January 8 revolution" and voted, once again, for momentous change in the country's style of governance.
The defeat looks set to scupper his planned political comeback.
Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena recently dissolved parliament. The election will be held on August 17; a new parliament will gather on September 1. Yet what happens next is still far from clear.
Richard E. Hoagland, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the U.S. State Department's Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, recently spoke at the Washington International Business Council.
Local and international print media continue to bring charges against the former Rajapaksa government, but overlook the dangers posed by the current Sri Lankan regime to the rule of law, democracy and freedom of expression.
With a transfer of power in Sri Lanka, a complicated situation has become even more complex and the tension between geopolitics and human rights or justice is not a zero-sum game.
Corruption and coup allegations coupled with the fact that Rajapaksa no longer heads the Sri Lanka Freedom Party makes a comeback very difficult, but ruling it out completely seems premature.
It's difficult to describe just how shocking it is that Maithripala Sirisena, not Mahinda Rajapaksa, is the seventh president of Sri Lanka.
The adoption of the third U.S.-sponsored resolution by the United Nations Human Rights Council on Sri Lanka will now result in an international investigation being carried out in to the conduct of the civil war in the country.
Pressure on the Sri Lankan government continues to mount as they appear not to be pursuing any genuine plan of reconciliation.
Allowing these war crimes allegations to go unaddressed would undermine important international legal norms while rendering true reconciliation in the country an even more remote prospect.
Time is clearly running out for the Sri Lankan government, the international community has shown that their patience is wearing thin.
As the last four years have shown, repeated pronouncements by U.S. and numerous other officials recommending that Sri Lanka take proper action have done nothing to bring even the slightest measure of justice for the horrific crimes of 2009.
Four years have passed since Sri Lanka's brutal and bloody civil war came to an aggressive end. At the time many rejoiced with the news. It now appears as though reconciliation is playing second fiddle to the growing political intrigue on all sides.