maidan

“Why did I come here, and what did my friends give their lives for?”
While it would certainly be premature to predict the disintegration of the European Union at this point, the United Kingdom's recent departure from the bloc via "Brexit" referendum certainly casts a dark shadow over the continent's political future.
From Venezuela to Brazil to Argentina, the political left is crumbling, raising real questions about the durability of South America's so-called "Pink Tide." In Caracas, the future of Chávez protégé Nicolás Maduro remains unclear amidst plunging world oil prices, rampant inflation, power shortages and scarcity of basic goods.
The Revolution of Dignity is far from finished. But "Winter on Fire" is a fitting testament to the remarkable Ukrainian people who are determined to finally become a free European nation.
My first visit to Ukraine was in February 1992 and the City of Kiev was gray, bleak and joyless as was the rest of the Soviet Union. Last month I re-visited -- 23 years and several other assignments later -- to find a new nation of extremes
While the trajectory Armenia will take still remains unclear, Sargasyan's best hopes for survival depend on using limited repression and to deter an aggressive Russian response by emphasizing the domestic undercurrents of the current protests.
Putting a film festival together is never an easy task. There are flight and hotel arrangements to be made, films to secure from their sales agents, celebrities to invite and locations to be booked.
For Ukrainians, corruption is one of the most pressing problems facing society today. According to the Economist, "weak institutions, low morale, and an underdeveloped sense of public service have made everyone liable to corruption over Ukraine's entire post-Soviet history."
Amidst increasing hostilities in Ukraine, many of the social aims of the Maidan revolution could be lost or simply forgotten. That, at least, is the impression I got from speaking to activists on the independent left circuit, not to be confused with the old Soviet and authoritarian left.
Listen too much to Kremlin pronouncements, and one might get the impression that the Ukrainian government in Kiev is comprised of nothing less than a malevolent and sinister fascist junta.