maker-movement

There are infinite possibilities of where we can go when we choose to actively consider and participate in the changes that are happening all around us. Let's make something meaningful.
When my kids were young, making things involved macaroni, feathers, glue and paper plates. The desire to make things and the joy that comes with completion has not diminished. But boy have the tools changed.
For the Maker Movement to grow up it's going to need to incorporate some of this organizational common sense. I'd be thinking hard about how to connect makers and the things they make, with the people who need them.
To my Boomer eye, the best thing about RadioShack is a much bolder and a potentially bigger win. RadioShack could claim its rightful position as the center of the Maker universe, the same way it cut its teeth on tinkerers all those years ago.
My eyes scanned over page after page of items I would have expected to find in the kiosks of Daytona Beach, not on a website for handmade goods. I sat at my computer with my jaw on the keyboard, wondering what had just happened.
Political space -- the time and interest of elected leaders -- is not guaranteed to last. We need to make the benefits of an Internet-connected society more visible and permanent.
Here's the issue our nation is facing: The inability of the non-military side of our public institutions to process complex problems. Today, this competence and especially the capacity to solve technical challenges often exist only in the private sector.
When taking the state of our economy into consideration, buying local could be the best decision U.S. shoppers make this season.
With economic and technological disruption have come freedom, creativity, and chaos. People can experience all of the effects of these three states of mind in one day or in one hour of their lives.