makers and takers

The 47 percent remark that destroyed Mitt Romney in 2012 isn't impacting Trump’s 2016 campaign.
The Republican presidential nomination race has previously devolved to the level of an elementary school playground (penis-measuring in a national debate), and has now risen to at least high school (if not a college frat house) with the vicious battle going on between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz over who can insult each other's wives the most.
I thought it might be spiritually helpful to compare Fox's language about the poor to the language of Christ, both in substance and tone, and the deep feelings that these completely contrary languages, and their comparison, reveals.
If we learned nothing else during the 2012 election, it is that some of us are makers, hard-working folk solely responsible for America's prosperity, and others are takers, who want the federal government to pay for luxuries like food and health care.
The "takingest" states, in a tie, are Mississippi and New Mexico, according to the analysis. Both states take about $3 in
Were the richest .01 percent to venture out and form their own society, the rest of us would not devolve into violent conflict; rather, without the expensive burden of the wealthy tapeworms siphoning our common wealth, we could begin to solve our problems.
I come from a long line of Takers, in the strict sense of the (idiotic) term. My grandparents, on both sides, came to this country from eastern Europe, in steerage. They lived in the Bronx -- my much maligned New York City borough -- and worked hard all their lives.
Early in "Oliver Twist," a starving, orphaned Oliver asks, "Please, sir, I want some more [food]." The shocked orphanage master responds by clobbering, imprisoning, disparaging and eventually evicting Oliver. Contrast that with God's response to the starving, recently liberated Israelites.
It's easy to understand why a professional golfer might believe editorials, politicians and e-mails that spread the myth of an America evenly divided between makers and takers, but it's harder to tolerate the malicious spreading of that fabrication.
"No one is suggesting that what we call our earned entitlements -- entitlements you pay for, like payroll takes for Medicare
Jack Welch says something's fishy: would a maker be born in a manger?
The American people in this election heard the generosity-breeds-dependency philosophy, and they heard Barack Obama and Elizabeth Warren and other Democrats say that we are all in this together, that we are our brothers' and sisters' keepers, that we need to lift each other up.
Ryan has been making similar statements for years. His 60 percent comment to Jones was not a one-time gaffe, but an iteration