management skills

Obama became a master of compartmentalizing his time and focus over the course of his presidency.
In interviews with a few hundred students at one of the largest universities in the US, we learned that the majority of students
If you haven't worked for these managers, you've heard about them. Employees buzz about these bosses over lunch, complain about them around the water cooler, and chew them up at the dinner table with their spouse. And if these leaders don't get some feedback or training from their superiors, they'll soon cost their organization big bucks because of employee turnover.
The CEO and the CFO set in opposite corners of the room. But both stuck their hands into the air just as I called for questions at the end of my keynote. "Why don't employees communicate upward in an organization?" the CEO asked with a twinge of frustration.
What are the competencies, skills and knowledge that managers are going to need to deal with the changing work environment of the future? Here is what it is that people managers will need to do, learn and embrace in order to be fit for the future.
The essence of leadership is communication: to cast a vision, to inspire, to collaborate on strategy, and to engage followers in accomplishing a mission. But let's face it: Many leaders fall flat on their face when it comes to communication.
Like artists, wise leaders focus, analyze, and study a subject. Then they decide and act. And even then, as Oswald Chambers put it: "It's never wise to be cocksure." Consider the following nine differences between smart managers and wise leaders
Your relationships are formed through conversations stacked end to end. So it pays to get rid of the mechanical things that cripple them.
At a very basic level, EQ is about self-awareness (what am I feeling now?) and social awareness (how will my emotions impact the people in the room)?
Boomers face the increasing perception that they are getting long in the tooth, and that younger managers are better prepared to lead project teams going forward. Yet the truth is that over 80 percent of corporate managers are not only ill-suited to their jobs, but their lack of leadership negatively impacts profitability.