managing employees

Let's face it helping people to realize their potential can be hard work. The truth is most of us lack the knowledge and skills to support someone in making lasting changes when it comes to the way they think, feel or act at work.
Poor orientation or on-boarding results in employee burnout and, as a result, a lack of productivity in your small business. What can you do to prevent this problem? Avoid making the following employee on-boarding mistakes.
Whether you're the President of the United States making an address to the nation or a business manager writing an announcement to his employees, when you have news to deliver there's one key choice at the outset: should you state the decision first and then explain the reasoning or build up to your decision, making the case as you go along?
And this is how you can help: And what do their companies get in return? Out of the box thinking, creativity, a workforce
The management of the federal workforce--effectively using talent, providing training, creating opportunities for promotions--can have a profound effect on employee performance and job satisfaction.
Remote workers are an increasingly important part of daily operations for modern businesses. Even so, many companies struggle with how to properly manage their virtual staff. Here are five tips to help you get things back under control and maximize your productivity--and that of your remote workers.
Focusing on happiness rather than on 'working harder' could give employers the advantage they need to become more engaged and productive at work. It's a science that seems intuitive yet not one that's traditionally considered a concern for management.
You want to be generous and flexible with your employees. Why wouldn't you? Everybody is working harder. Everybody is under more pressure. Everybody needs more than what they are getting.
With their laid back attitude and multitasking approach, the tech-savvy Gen Y might be the hardest generation yet to manage in a corporate environment. Organizational psychologist Kathy Turner offers insight on how to optimize the performance of your Gen Y workers.
Finding the right formula for managing employee time off during the warmer months -- especially in northern cities -- is like a favorite summertime cocktail: one part planned vacation, one part ad hoc request, with a dash of playing hooky.
As a manager, you have to work with diverse personae on an even closer level. And let's face it, some of those characters are difficult to deal with. Some may even seem, ahem, unmanageable.
Remember the old rule when it comes to school teachers? Start off very strict and then, after the students come to expect, accept, and adapt to the strict regime, you can relax a bit. The same basic rule applies to managing employees, but you have to do it one person at a time
It's never an ideal situation when you're stuck with an employee you cannot stand working with. Whether it's because of their work ethic or their character, sometimes you will realize you have an employee who you wish would just quit.
Merging of two companies means sorting out how the company is going to be managed, who is going to manage it of course, but more importantly how.
Employees perform at different levels, when on different teams, in different situations with different people. Why do so many leaders spend so little time looking for synergies on their teams and so much time looking at individual performance?
What's it going to take to do Human Resources right and make employees, and yourself, happy? The answer: More than you think, especially if you're an H.R. klutz like me.
Suing an employer is the last thing a worker should ever do if the aim is a successful career.
Executive Editor Rod Kurtz explains how to hire tech geeks, why more investors are looking overseas and what you can do to stay on Aaron Sorkin's good side.
There are times when an employee will not agree with a decision that you have made. If the employee is not thinking to him or herself, "well I don't agree with her, but I do believe in her so I will respect the decision," the employee's relationship is doomed to fail and until it does, it will be a painful one.
Game On Rieva Lesonsky is CEO of GrowBiz Media, a media company that helps entrepreneurs start and grow their businesses