manhattan project

"But of what avail is this knowledge [of the atom] if we use it to destroy cities and people, to devastate the countryside
J. Robert Oppenheimer was a man interested in mystic Eastern religions, a Communist sympathizer, and widely considered, "the father of the atomic bomb."
As a second generation American, I am grateful for the opportunities with which I am blessed today. For this column, I decided to profile some women immigrants who contributed significantly to our country.
It seemed the bombs had been worth it, saving countless American (and Japanese) lives, seeing that a major invasion of the Japanese home islands was no longer needed.  But was the A-bomb truly decisive in convincing the Japanese to surrender?
A little over 70 years ago, Paul Olum stood with his colleagues in the desert near Alamogordo, NM. They had spent the last few years designing the first atomic bomb. Six days after the bombing of Nagasaki, World War II was over -- and Paul Olum became a lifelong advocate of nuclear arms control and disarmament.
It was seventy years ago that human beings were first targeted with -- and annihilated by -- an atomic bomb.
Earlier this week, world powers joined forces to curb Iran's controversial nuclear program. But 70 years ago, the rush to
For scientists, the internet is now a communal research group. This learning and group communication mode is becoming known as "collective intelligence" and "crowd-sourced innovation."
While only used in conflict twice, the devastating effect of nuclear weapons is clear enough to have changed the course of
Computers run the world--our airports, airplanes, cars, hospitals, stock markets and power grids--and these computers too are shockingly vulnerable to attack. Though we're racing forward at breakneck speed to connect all the objects in our physical world  to the Internet, we still fundamentally do not have the trustworthy computing required to make it so.
If we are to reverse the trend of violence and environmental destruction on our planet, we need many, many more such people. It's time for a Manhattan Project focused on our most wasted resource: our capacity for good.
Yvonne C. Brill received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Obama in October 2011 "for innovation in rocket propulsion systems for geosynchronous." Other women have received these medals, also for groundbreaking accomplishments.
The U.S. did not apply the knee-jerk capitalistic model of mobilizing competition. Had we succumbed to that model, the government might have offered grants and other incentives to encourage individual scientists, universities, private and publicly held companies to compete in a race to develop the bomb -- with benefits to the winner.
From his work on the Manhattan Project to the key role he played in explaining the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, Richard
Aerial view of the plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee Driving to Oak Ridge, I passed through the adjacent town of Clinton and
During this time of commemoration of man's inhumanity, visited upon the people of Japan three generations ago, let us resolve that we shall demand leaders who will resist the impulse to solve political and security problems through weapons of mass destruction.
A wave of new books and shows has washed into the summer of 2014, all built around the theme of the greatest secret of World War II: the making of the atomic bomb.
While occasionally throwing in flimsy references to the increasingly inflammatory ruling class/workers condition, the flamenco
I felt slightly nauseated and, being the only American there, tremendously self-conscious. But the Japanese smiled, were incredibly polite as is their nature. I could detect no outward hostility. I smiled back, sheepishly, but I sure felt guilty inside.