marginalization

While I do not share his feelings about the Stones, I do find his sign reflective of my feelings about your party and some
Increasingly, college faculty and campuses (whether in New England or elsewhere in the United States) that the author identifies
And we must stand forever vigilant in protecting our impressionable children from the exploits of the Jews and the homosexuals
My brain frantically scours for the line between the patience we have grown and groomed over these days on Umrah and the right to defend one's dignity against defamation -- not to mention an additional stand against an entire gender's general reduction into one, incapable stereotype -- but my mind quickly realizes we are way past this point.
When President Barack Obama, in his State of the Union address, challenged the nation to "reject any politics that targets people because of race or religion," he offered a social commentary that has timely relevance in higher education.
For men of color, the daily reality on campus and in the workplace is one of struggle and marginalization. Men of color are often concentrated into "non-choice" jobs during college that inhibit their academic success.
While middle-class white gays and lesbians picketed the White House wearing suits and skirts, trans women of color threw their heels at police officers and taunted the cops by forming kick-lines and singing raunchy songs. While assimilation-oriented gays pleaded with the queer community for peace in Greenwich Village, enraged queers used parking meters as battering rams to break down the door of the Stonewall Inn and reclaim their safe space from the mob and the police.
Somebody needs to stand in the public square and ask the questions: Are we interested in the fundamental principle of life, which is justice for all? Are we sincere in building true relationships and developing the prophetic gifts that reside not only from those in pews but outside of the church?
A study released last month by the American Educational Research Association found that minority students are underrepresented
Is this to be the brave new gay world? A world in which the public face of the queer community -- the gay, the white, the cisgender and the wealthy -- take their place among society's elite, leaving the transgender, the non-white, the poor and the homeless to fend for themselves?
Catholic Vote has created a video, "Not Alone," in opposition to last week's Supreme Court ruling granting same-sex couples the right to marry. On their website, they tell us that the video is about "6 courageous young people" who want to "tell the world" that they are not afraid to express their views against same-sex marriage. This video is offensive. Here's why.
Whenever anyone of us is diminished, we are all demeaned, when anyone or any group remains institutionally and socially stigmatized, marginalized, excluded, or disenfranchised, when violence comes down upon any of us, the possibility for authentic community cannot be realized unless and until we challenge it in truly transformational ways.
Asian Americans are grateful to Tan for writing a novel that gives some visibility to a concealed minority group. Her novel gives a voice to young people who struggle to articulate the relational dynamics that they experience as they grow up with immigrant parents.
Disability metaphors abound in our culture, and they exist almost entirely as pejoratives. You see something wrong? Compare it to a disabled body or mind. These words seem so "natural" to people that they go uncorrected a great deal of the time.
Phil Robertson, in his own misguided and offensive fashion, has given us as a society much to unpack by his linking multiple issues and multiple form of oppression (heterosexism, racism, classism, environmental control and degradation), and all in the context of religious justification.
If we addicts want to make real changes for ourselves -- socially, politically -- we must stop participating in our own degradation. Painting ourselves as uncanny abominations who see things that normal people cannot see -- all of this simply plays into the ongoing marginalization of addicts and drug users everywhere.
We are "gravely disordered," "afflicted with evil tendencies," our relationships constitute a "troubling moral and social phenomenon," and "a destruction of God's work," which "threatens human dignity and the future of humanity itself," but the Church somehow deeply respects us?
My book is a continuation of my work on giving voices to marginalized peoples, groups, and communities. The theme that stitches all of the essays together to create a colorful tapestry is the intersection of sexuality and ethnicity.