Marian Wright Edelman

Marian Wright Edelman believes if you don’t like the way the world is, you change it.
Presented by TIAA
As a child I hated not being allowed into the segregated library in my hometown. But I am honored and grateful that today the Marlboro County Public Library -- the Marian Wright Edelman Library in Bennettsville, SC -- provides a panoply of early childhood and adult literacy programs.
America's Cradle to Prison Pipeline is a toxic cocktail of poverty, illiteracy, racial disparities, violence and massive incarceration which sentences millions of children of color to social and economic death. Once young people have entered, to many they become just a statistic.
Once again, Hillary's husband's legacy when it comes to blacks has been thoroughly photoshopped, given his virtual destruction of welfare while he was POTUS.
Traces of this other Washington are everywhere. As the new capital was rising from former woods and swampland, slaves labored on many of its buildings, including the White House and the Capitol.
The start of this New Year finds America at an inflection point as wars and terrorism abroad are echoed in violence, suspicion, and fear at home. How will we meet the moment?
This holy season as Christians honor and celebrate the birth of the world's most famous poor baby born in a manger, I hope we all will pause to remember the 15.5 million invisible poor babies and children in our rich country who need our help to survive and thrive and reach their God-given potential.
Help us to love and respect and protect and welcome them all on this day of Thanksgiving as we affirm the sacredness of every child in our own country and all around the world.
Pope Francis speaks out faithfully and forcefully against poverty and has been called "the pope of the poor." But on his first visit to the United States there was demoralizing news about poverty, especially child poverty, in our nation -- the world's largest economy.
Whether assisting with care, finances or fun -- grandparents, grand-aunts and uncles and grandfriends are stepping up to make sure the children in their lives succeed.
I am a native South Carolinian. Charleston is my maternal ancestral home. My great grandmother was born during slavery. My great grandfather I have been told was a plantation overseer. Never have I been more proud and more ashamed of my dueling ancestral heritages than right now.
As U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan put it, "I am increasingly worried that our teachers, our administrators don't reflect the great diversity of our nation's students, and that is a real problem."
Last week, I went back to Oberlin for my 50th reunion where much of the weekend was a celebration of our graduation ceremony in 1965, whose commencement speaker was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Imagine what his prophetic voice might have accomplished had he lived into the 21st century.
Light her candle, let in some additional light and life to your workplace ... as she is a daughter, a sister, potentially a future mother, scientist, IT leader and she needs you to help her light up her path.
In this blog, we'll learn about the contributions to our culture and economy from women with ties to South Carolina. Match the woman with her accomplishment.
Something is deeply awry in our nation with the world's biggest economy that lets its children be the poorest group and the younger they are the poorer they are during their years of greatest brain development. The Prince of Peace is mocked as we let a child be injured or killed by guns every thirty minutes.
This year’s honorees will be celebrated at Ebony’s Power 100 Gala on Wednesday in Los Angeles, including music legend Quincy
When teachers embrace students as individuals and recognize their personal strengths and needs, young people in poverty can develop the kind of confidence needed to propel them beyond their circumstances.
We don't have to be perfect saints or know every answer to every question to begin working for a more just world. We can be wounded or hesitant ourselves, sometimes profoundly so.