mark bertolini

Give us our merger or we'll quit Obamacare, the insurer told Justice Department officials in a July letter.
The Aetna CEO had to be a patient before he could become a major force in health care.
Regardless of sector, race, or age, we all want the same things for our families and ourselves: as my mother says, "health, happiness, safety, the strength to cope with anything that comes our way." Here are six practices that help me get a little closer to whole heart health.
The health insurance provider Aetna wants you to know the difference a good night's rest makes.
Managers evaluate employees. It's part of our jobs. We use data, of course -- performance metrics, targets and reviews. But we often start with a quick and informal assessment based on the first things that come to mind about the person.
Mindfulness is a committed, concerted, targeted practice -- a life skill. While pausing for a few deep breaths may make you feel better in the moment, practicing and training regularly will allow you to achieve long lasting results, brain health, and that calmer, less reactive place of being.
You see, mindfulness isn't about perfection or reaching some artificial standard. It starts -- and continues -- with the simple daily decision that you want to become aware of what's really going on in you and in your life.
The buzz about Etsy's IPO runs something like this... the company that connects artisans and home-based craft makers to a new kind of consumer hungry for unique products -- has met its nemesis: the public equity markets.
Inequality is a problem for everyone -- for business, for the health of the democracy and for society at large. Our free-enterprise system is the driver of income and wealth. Business leaders don't have to wait for government solutions to the inequality problem. They have the tools at hand -- they just need the courage to step away from the pack and use them.
Bertolini's company also implemented yoga and mindfulness practices at work and studied the effect they had on the employees
Cynics will point out that while Aetna may be a first mover in the health care industry, the total cost of Bertolini's announcement is chump change. Aetna's profits weigh in at about $2 billion per year.
What Boeing is doing represents a seismic shift in health care financing and delivery that potentially will have more far-reaching effects than Obamacare, primarily because it is coming from the private sector, not the government.
Almost all of the publicly traded health insurers reported big increases in revenue and profits last year. The big winners have been the top executives of those companies, led by Mark Bertolini, CEO of Aetna, the nation's third largest health insurer.
Mark Bertolini, CEO of Aetna, joins HuffPost Live at Davos.
Both the AAN and Chamber have spent millions on ads calling for the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. While Aetna stands to gain financially from the law, it and other insurers have been critical of the potentially profit-threatening consumer protections and regulations in it.
Politicians and the media were all too willing to repeat what CEOs of big for-profit insurance corporations were saying without analyzing their motives or taking into account the fact that the marketplaces will force real competition in the health insurance world.
"The only way we're going to save money, improve the quality of care, improve people's lives is by focusing on prevention