Mark Boal

Thankfully, it's from the team behind "Zero Dark Thirty."
Both Boal and Bigelow seem intent on shoving aside the true facts about torture's effectiveness. All Boal would offer when I queried him on the subject recently was the pallid response that the issue was "politically controversial, as you know."
The win for Argo over Lincoln in the Adapted category further bolstered notions about what may happen next week at the Oscars for Best Picture.
At B. B. King's on Sunday night, at the Writers Guild of America Award ceremony, amidst a lot of foul-mouthed laughs and sober-minded speeches, writer/director Nora Ephron was remembered.
2013-02-01-ScreenShot20130201at4.49.35PM.pngWhen considering torture and terror, the first question of relevance is, Do we require an experience of torture and terror first hand, either as a survivor or as a witness, to be credible on the subject?
The discussion about Django seems diffuse and unfocused. People can't seem to agree about what it is they disagree about when criticizing or praising the film. The same is true of Kathryn Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty.
"It's a great movie," Panetta said. "You know, it's a great movie. But when you've lived what happened, as far as the main
In a blog on The Huffington Post, Moore notes that, in the movie, it is not until Barack Obama orders torture be stopped
The version of events offered by Zero Dark Thirty substitutes pulp fiction -- of the mythological kind -- for truth. It satisfies a gnawing hunger; it meets a powerfully felt need.
The answers given by Bigelow and Boal to justify the normalizing of torture in Zero Dark Thirty have been vain, wheedling, and dodgy. They are a clever pair of filmmakers, without political or moral depth, but here, perhaps more than they realized, they were playing with fire.
Why aren't film director Kathryn Bigelow's claimed government sources, including employees of the CIA, in jail like Pfc. Bradley Manning? Or, at the very least, being investigated for their role in one of the most damaging leaks of national security information in U.S. history?
Zero Dark Thirty ignores the fact that America's torture program inspired anti-U.S. sentiment around the world, causing many to vow revenge on the U.S. and its allies.
What do you get when you put a master of suspense, a tour de force of acting and the most fascinating true story of the last decade together? The answer is "Zero Dark Thirty."
When we talk about torture "working" -- in the context of al Qaeda, for instance -- we presumably mean successfully extracting accurate information. But that's not what torture is about, and never has been.
"Zero Dark Thirty" received Oscar nominations on Thursday for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay (by Mark Boal), Best
Zero Dark Thirty works as a crime procedural, but its irresponsible, destructive, dishonest stance on torture absolutely ruined it for me, and I feel Zero Dark Thirty should not be on any best-of-the-year lists, nor is it deserving of Oscar consideration.
Do yourself a favor, and don't go see Zero Dark Thirty. Don't encourage film-making that at best offers ambiguity about torture, and at worst endorses it. Spend the two and a half hours and the $10 on something more valuable, and moral.