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● Niveen Khashab of Saudi Arabia, for her newly developed techniques designed to "monitor intracellular antioxidant activity
There were a variety of announcements throughout the keynote, by Zuckerberg and other Oculus executives, but the takeaway was simple: Oculus intends to build the Metaverse.
Facebook users should be concerned if the company is so committed to the perspective of content creators that it cannot tolerate its board members even being involved in the exploration of an issue.
While we appreciate the noble intentions of Free Basics, Facebook's actions and strategic business investments in Africa need to reflect its vision of bringing internet access to all Africans. Not just a slice of the internet, but all of it.
It's probably fair to say that those of us, who were born before the 80s, have used different methods than our younger friends. Millennials have integrated technology in their approach, an approach that many refer to as "the code."
When an innovative company takes an active role in creating benefits for society, it not only has the opportunity to create
Both you and I are private individuals, but as news of our personal lives has made its way into the public arena, there appears
I started Googling what to do and learned that Facebook has recently instituted a policy that it can block anyone without
Advances in scientific discovery are converging with unparalleled policy and regulatory action for medical research. At FasterCures, we have surveyed the landscape and interviewed subject matter experts to come up with our recommendations of the top 10 issues to keep an eye on in 2016.
One of the more attractive features of the new philanthropy is also one of its potential pitfalls: Many tech billionaires may not fully appreciate the fact that rapid cycles of testing, failing, and fine-tuning may work better in software development than in social welfare programs on which lives depend.
While the little blue thumb prepares to beam itself into sub-Saharan Africa, let's take a moment to acknowledge that maybe "the social network" is much, much more than what any of us could have imagined.
Mark Zuckerberg stunned the world yesterday. Not with the announcement of a baby girl. Everybody knew that was coming. It was an accompanying letter outlining his and his wife Priscilla's plan to donate 99 percent of Facebook stock (valued now at $45 billion) to a foundation.
It will take quite some time for the company to see tangible financial returns from the initiative. I would expect that Facebook's approach to India is that it is investing for the longer-term.
Downtown Newark is only 12 miles from lower Manhattan, but there are days when the distance seems much greater. While New York grapples with gentrification and globalization, Newark struggles -- with some signs of success -- to revive its economy.
No one wants more government and you can't legislate morality, but obviously, there is a growing movement in Congress to at least make the FMLA fair and equitable and put value on the backbone of America's success -- people who work.
"I like plays that feel like somebody took a fun house mirror and put it up to the real world, and it's sort of reflecting back a version of it to you. I find that, in looking at that reflection, you can start to understand a little more about your life."
Deleting Facebook seemed to be a way to reclaim some sort of simplicity (as did turning off my phone for a two-week break). I made the decision at a time when life seemed too much.
In an era where tent pole summer blockbusters provide meal tickets for any movie star cast to wear a cape and cowl, the pinnacle of a Hollywood career is now found in a superhero costume.
The CEO of the world's largest social media platform has announced his new year's resolution, and it involves ancient technology: 2015 is the year of the book. Mark Zuckerberg declared he is going to "read a new book every other week" throughout 2015. He has invited the whole world to join him.