mars one

My best friend Vanessa Nigro Halby and I used to climb almost daily. We met at the climbing gym, when I saw her tumbling off the top of a bouldering wall because she missed the last dyno. That's climbing speak for a move that can only be made by jumping for it. If you miss it, you'll fall.
We all know about this go-to-Mars-and-never-come-back-thing, right? If not, type "Mars One" on any electronic device and check it out. I'm totally sure that the idea of a one-way trip to the Red Planet significantly contributed to the media success of this project. Nevertheless, every single time I answer questions from the public, fans and reporters, I get stuck on this point: the "no-return policy."
I find myself living at a very particular point in the almost 4 billion years of the evolution of life on this planet. I feel extraordinarily lucky to be alive right now, when for the very first time, we are able to investigate terrestrial life on scales smaller than the size of atoms, as well as look to the skies for evidence of extra-terrestrial life many hundreds of light years beyond Earth.
After thousands of people applied for Mars One from all over the world, only 1,058 were chosen by December 2013 for round two. I was one of them. I was shocked when I received that email. I probably read it like 10 times, with one thought crossing my mind. Why me?
I was an atheist who died and discovered I was wrong. A "straight-A" kid willing to worship only the preachings of scientific method, finding all religion and spiritual mumbo jumbo to be a crock o' shit. That is, until I stopped breathing.
We might be able to live on Mars one day, but it won't be easy.
If humanity wants to continue, it has to shoot for the stars. The future, if we have one, is indeed a Star Trek, my friends. But it is also people like Leonard Nimoy -- artists, optimists, dreamers and thinkers. The people who will one day really take us to the stars.
Now that a week has passed since the "we regret to inform you" email from Mars One signaled my elimination from the planned mission to send the first humans to the red planet, it's time to unpack.
Mars One candidate Kenya Armbrister joins HuffPost Live to explain why she wants to live on Mars.
On Friday morning, I found out that my girlfriend is forwarding to the next round of Mars One. The Mars One candidacy endeavor is choosing 24 (extra) ordinary citizens of the earth to colonize the red planet.
Lieu isn't worried. Lieu will find out next month if she will join 39 other people who will actually train for the one-way
I'm trapped in a box, living two distinct futures. In one I live on Mars, with the inherent complexities, perils and lack of creature comforts that the first colonists will encounter there. In the other I'm spending the remainder of my days here on Earth, sipping tea in a comfy chair that swivels, rocks and reclines, with two out of three cats within easy reach most of the time.
Our earliest astronauts were test pilots; their selection followed strict criteria of age, gender, and flight experience that severely limited participation. Are we in danger of creating another exclusive group of spacefarers?
"We found many problem areas, many of which revolve around the current capability of state-of-the-art technologies," Sydney