Martin Seligman

When they slip up, they simply forgive themselves and move on.
It’s truly fascinating how successful people approach problems. Where others see impenetrable barriers, they see challenges
When we believe that we can control our surroundings, we perform better.
Stress and adversity is a consistent theme of life. Simple tools will help you become more resilient to both the small and large adversities life throws your way.
Further, it may be fair to suggest that as life has become more and more busy, people continue to become more socially isolated
For a more time-intensive expression of gratitude try this: When was the last time you thought about someone who made an impact on your life? This person could have been your parent or grandparent, a teacher, a coach, a business mentor, or anyone.
Happiness is sometimes represented as elusive or fantasy metaphorically symbolized with unicorns and rainbows. It may seem completely out of reach for the even-keeled and more so for the depressed among us.
Personally I espouse and teach one facet of Martin Seligman's "Positive Psychology," which is that everyone has a range of happiness and there are tools that keep us in the higher echelons of our happiness ranges.
Having taken a step back to observe my dogs and other dogs too, the following is what I believe they would convey were they equipped with verbal communication capabilities that we could understand. Dogs would tell you these 10 things...
What can we learn from the "father" of positive psychology's two theories of happiness? Don't chase pleasure or positive emotions. You don't have to be sunny all the time in order to flourish. Instead, pursue flow states, and serve something bigger than yourself.
KIPP Schools, Success Academies, Democracy Prep and any number of other "no excuses" schools are not developing true grit and resilience other than the numb grit required to endure humiliation and the resilience necessary to get up and go to school every day.
Of all the subjects covered, none is more harrowing than the story of Melissa Moody, a former debutante and beauty queen who was run over by truck in 1992, resulting in the permanent disfigurement of her face.
I can think of many things our world needs. I can think of few things the world needs more, however, than this: better people living better lives in a world gone very wrong.
Mental health practitioners, like journalists, are -- as I see it -- obligated to raise even controversial and provocative questions and to help us make sense of, not only individual pathology, but also the group narrative in any given period of time.