Marxism

Brace Belden volunteered for six months in Syria with the Kurdish freedom movement where he helped fight ISIS.
I recently wrote a critique of the Marxists (and key Democratic Party strategists) who dismiss national liberation and gender
As the Democratic Party licks its wounds and lurches toward some kind of direction after the disaster of the Trump seizure
Sapiens by Yuval Harari (the best possible book to read together) Postwar by Tony Judt Wild Swans by Jung Chang (this one
Outlandish Kurdish-Vermont Connection Moreover, Rojava has made tremendous strides towards greater ethnic equality. Indeed
It took me having my own black son to actually feel the injustice that I always knew was there. I look at him and experience
I began doing your standard breath meditation in the early 1970s. I was helped along in part by a men's consciousness-raising
From bookstores to bathhouses to bars, gay people in the 1970s often did not look for the approval of straight people, and they did their own thing.
Robert Mugabe rose to prominence in the 1960s as the leader of the Zimbabwe African National Union during the conflict against the conservative white-minority government during the Rhodesian Bush War and was a political prisoner in Rhodesia for more than 10 years.
Professor Žižek shares his deep admiration for Malcolm X, whose insights Žižek believes reached the height of contemporary philosophy.
Modern science understands that everything is connected to everything. So too do all major religions, and virtually all wisdom traditions understand this core principle, often summarized by the concept of "oneness."
Strange scents are wafting through the air. Scents one would have thought had drifted away for good. The wind of words like Marxism, Capitalism, and Socialism have returned, anchoring here and there the distant flashbacks of troubled times.
French economist Thomas Piketty recently explained what he hoped his landmark book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, would
BUENOS AIRES -- Those Europeans tempted by populist politics should see in Latin America an avoidable future: the empty shelves in Venezuela while its government finds funds to support populist party Podemos in Spain or the stagflation in Argentina that hurts the poor while the sitting vice president is twice indicted for embezzlement. These are not accidents; they are the logical consequences of authoritarian regimes that think themselves beyond reproach or term limits.
It took Linda Coleman 15 years to write her memoir Radical Descent: The Cultivation of an American Revolutionary, a soul searching and gripping account of her involvement as a young woman with a violent left wing underground group in the 1970s.
For students of religion and students of revolution, the upcoming dialogue between Cornel West and Bob Avakian should be a valuable lesson.