Mass hysteria

Everywhere I looked on my way home, someone was asking for help.
Just as quickly as everyone had crossed over to the next car, the door hurled open and this time, the man who was being confronted sped past us towards the front of the car. "He's got a gun," he said, his voice cracking.
It's scary that history is on the verge of repeating itself with a potential world leader like Donald Trump.
One of the greatest challenges is helping your teens gain, and maintain, perspective. We all remember the intensity of feeling as a teen, and social media means it doesn't go away with the school day ends. It's constant. It can feel like a constant assault to the senses, to feeling.
As a suggestion from my therapist, I rise early to sit with legs crossed and eyes closed to breathe in "Let" and breathe out "Go" and my mind races like the #BlackFriday shoppers -- dashing, jabbing, prancing on top of the faces of neighbors like reindeer to get a cheaper television.
Other hypotheses, including military experiments and submarine communications, have yet to bear any fruit. For now, hearers
I had often heard of collective amnesia, voter apathy, and electoral ignorance, but I had never bought into them as unshakable truisms. Yet now here it was staring me in the face -- in a presidential year. And in part, I was now facing a personal type of amnesia, as well.
2011-11-29-20111107bothsidesnow.jpgReagan and Matalin skip who's up-down in the GOP contest to debate spurting gas prices, the constitutionality of "Obamacare" and our exit strategy from Afghanistan post- massacre. Then: do presidential speeches ever matter, Mr. Reagan?
For an episode of mass hysteria to begin, all that is necessary is troubled times in the culture, a shared set of beliefs and a final, fearful, anxiety-provoking trigger to set the phenomenon into motion.
Until more is known about mass hysteria, the treatment of a 1789 case in Northern England might point the way to a cure both