matt harvey

Starting pitching was a given from day one. The closer role, however, was a bit more of a question mark going into last season
What a difference a year makes. Last year during Spring Training in Port St. Lucie, Florida, the Mets were expected to contend with the cellar. The Nationals were predicted to win the National League East. Then something crazy happened on the way to last place -- they never reached it.
"He wanted the ball. He is a competitor. Guys want the ball in that situation."
The ability to "center down" in a crisis, whether it's exhilarating or life threatening, determines the outcome of many critical decisions in life. It is a wonder that mental control is not taught as a major life lesson for all of us.
For the past several weeks I have seen a multitude of stories from the wild world of sport that have struck me as something about which I wanted to write and set my brain whirring.
Before we get too upset at not winning the World Series, let us ask: Was there a Mets fan anywhere when the season began -- or in late July -- who wouldn't have been ecstatic with the team winning National League championship?
NEW YORK (AP) — The Kansas City Royals keep finding new ways to win this October. And now with one more victory in November
The series switches to New York. For the Mets, it couldn't have come at a better time. It is still early, but for any player with a pulse, it must be a gut check to have a squad beat your horses two nights in a row.
The Mets pitching staff is nothing to be grim about, and despite Max Scherzer no hitting the Mets, Matt Harvey struck out 11 and gave up just one run in six innings.
The amount of vitriol unleashed on Matt Harvey for wanting a long, healthy career is stunning to me. We have derided the old days of the reserve clause when players were treated like chattel, yet we condemn a young man for heeding the word of his doctor.
Pitchers drafted in the late rounds represent much smaller investments for the teams and are therefore expendable. This creates an incentive for the teams to push those late round draft picks who throw very hard through the minor league system quickly with little concern for their futures.
It may just be a game. It might just be an illusion of hope. It might be too early in the season to order playoff tickets. But it's starting to feel a lot like 1969. Or 1986.
Click below to watch Granderson's take on a shortage of black baseball players. Email me at jordan.schultz@huffingtonpost.com
Welcome to the 2015 season -- a faint glimmer of hope arrives on warmer winds for long-suffering Mets fans. After a frozen offseason, the Mets are set to open against the Washington Nationals this Sunday on ESPN. But there's something different in the air around CitiField.
One of the many great things about living in New York City is the abundance of sports teams. In every major sport, New York has not one, but at least two professional teams -- a luxury not afforded to smaller cities like Cleveland or even more cosmopolitan ones like Boston.
Despite four pennants and two World Series victories, the Mets have embraced the lovable loser narrative. This is a difficult thing to define; clearly Mets fans to prefer their team to win, but the existence of this narrative, even though its relationship to reality is more tenuous, gives the Mets a more forgiving environment than some teams.
Remarkable, isn't it, how many kids these days come up throwing nearly a hundred mikes per hour -- and how many soon find themselves on Dr. James Andrews' operating-table.