Matthew Modine

Barely old enough to drink, singer-actor Cierra Ramirez is poised to take the stage in global fashion with an urban/pop EP
In 1992 I was in the movie Equinox, starring Mathew Modine. I was cast as a waitress in the Villa Capri restaurant, where a big shoot-out took place between the twin brothers (both played by Matthew Modine).
Treat Williams stars in the festival's closing night movie made by former Long Island congressman Robert Mrazeck called The
Anger? You bet there's anger. But as revealed by Jen Senko's new documentary "The Brainwashing of My Dad," it is faux anger, caused by more than a generation of propaganda stemming from a coordinated far right takeover of media -- and brains.
Among those outraged by the initiative is life-long New York resident Matthew Broderick, who spoke against the plan in front
Jobs got hammered by critics and has performed poorly at the box office. However, I'm guessing a lot of those critics aren't like me -- someone who grew up on Apple computers, devoured Walt Isaacson's biography, and has followed the company's every move for years.
I love a great film festival -- people, together, not merely your flatscreen between your toes! -- and currently in Hollywood the 9th annual HollyShorts Film Festival is rolling in grand style.
There's nothing that terrible about Joshua Michael Stern's JOBS, a skimpy, often overly specific film biography about the late Apple inventor, Steve Jobs. Still, it would be interesting to see this film with another actor playing Jobs.
For every inspirational speech introducing yet a new more inventive product than the last, Jobs, so focused on his vision, loses his connection to those who love him. That is what makes him so compelling a figure, so flawed; in Joshua Michael Stern's film, he's in a league with Picasso.
"What's a Macintosh?" It's a line that may underscore the thesis of "Jobs," the Ashton Kutcher-headlined Steve Jobs biopic