Matthew Shepard Foundation

An Orlando-based community coalition wants the memorial's organizers to "put people first" instead of "educating tourists."
The memory of the anti-gay hate crime remains even as LGBTQ acceptance has advanced in the state.
The policies the current administration is trying to impose on the country are a direct assault on our community.
The Wyoming senator was speaking to a group of high school and middle school students.
Judy and Dennis Shepard, the parents of late gay historical figure Matthew Shepard and founders of the Matthew Shepard Foundation
People see parts of themselves in Matt, both good and bad, and then the message sinks in, that these victims are more than icons or figures. They're people who feel love, pain, happiness and sadness.
Even after 16 years, the name and story of Matthew Shepard, whose murder, carved into American history, represented a watershed moment that forever changed the conversation about the LGBT experience, not only still resonate but continue to have an impact.
At the end of my first year in college, just when I began to come out to my family and friends, I read about a young man in the United States, Matthew Shepard, who had been brutally murdered for being gay. This shocked me for many reasons -- first, because I identified with a few of Matthew's traits.
Defending Shepard as having been the victim of "a brutal, anti-gay hate crime," a spokesperson for the Matthew Shepard Foundation
1791: France adopted The French Penal Code of 1791, marking it as the first Western European country to decriminalize same