Maude

The sitcom creator "can't imagine an excuse" for excluding abortion storylines.
While Lear has always been game to tell other people's stories, it was only recently that he gave the nod to tell his own
For more food drink and travel videos visit www.potluckvideo.com Curtis Stone keeps busy with his tv shows and his two restaurants
The 67th Emmy Awards will come and go, and the winners will, no doubt, celebrate. It just reminds us every year that the shows we watch on a regular basis (or not), will get the recognition they deserve. Let's take a moment to shout out to an unrecognized category -- best catchphrases.
What's great about the Golden Age of Television is some of the lasting, nostalgic memories -- and some of the great one-liners delivered by the likes of Barney Fife (Don Knotts): "Nip it in the bud!" Or, our favorite greaser of all time, Fonzie (Henry Winkler), who made the first letter of the alphabet so special: "Aaay!"
"In television terms, one Betty White covers the entire demographic of seventy to a hundred and three. I think funny is funny and interesting is interesting."
Something unexpected happened last week while I was watching NBC's The New Normal, which after four episodes has distinguished itself as the best new sitcom of the fall season.
She led a fulfilling colorful life, and was a role model as a creative, older woman. And Rue McClanahan found love again.
The Norman Lear Center gets its name from a man whose belief in the power of entertainment to degrade and to do good, to demagogue and to uplift, to be both gloriously silly and urgently relevant, made him an industry pioneer.
All I remember of my brief meeting with Bea Arthur is this: I told her that she was fantastic, and she said with that famous deep voice, "Thank you, David." Thank you, Bernice.