maurice white

Scott Weiland fans watched with bated breath, hoping the 58th Grammys would show some appreciation for the late rock star, singer/songwriter, and frontman of two of rock and roll's most successful bands of the '90s and turn of the century.
Album-Oriented Radio played no music by black artists. A decade later, the Black Rock Coalition's Greg Tate aptly derided AOR as standing for "Apartheid-Oriented Radio." The fact that Earth, Wind & Fire sold zillions of records in the process meant nothing to AOR.
The best way to remember Maurice is to listen to him. And one of my favorite performances was on the old "Live By Request" show for which Mark McEwen was the ever genial host.
In paying tribute to Maurice White most people will think of White the musician, but I also want to bring attention to White the historian who was attempting to show African Americans that we are a people with a rich history.
One afternoon in the late '50s, a teenaged David Porter walks across the street from the grocery store he works at in Memphis and over to Satellite Records to see if, in addition to their country stuff, maybe they'd like to record some soul music.
The move was preceded by the triumphantastic sounds of the EWF horn section heard around the rarefied precincts of the World Economic Forum.