mayan calendar

Here are some Fall 2015 highlights from the University Press of Colorado (which also includes the Utah State University Press).
It's not clear what might have prompted the lowland Maya to give up their semi-settled life for permanent villages and cities
This base-20 Long Count calendar fell into disuse in the Mayan empire before Spanish explorers arrived in South and Central
What sets the Hanke-Henry Permanent Calendar apart is that it preserves the all-important seven-day Sabbath cycle, while also addressing numerous calendar-generated financial problems.
Something shifted to a new level for me. I knew I needed to act, live and breathe even more from this real, truthful, authentic and unconditional place in my life.
There were those who believed that based on the predictions of The Mayan Calendar, the world would cease to exist after December 21st, 2012. For many in Newtown CT, where I happen to reside, the Mayans were only off by a week.
At the Crossroads will stretch you, challenge you, shake you up and hopefully wake you up. Ultimately it will inspire you to see the world and yourself in a new way.
Fifty years ago Nahualá was minimal, strewn with some adobe (mud brick) houses along paths with people tending to a land, which was open and unhindered. In the time since, a fledgling urban center has developed.
If used mindfully, the calendar is a wonderful tool with which you can measure your year before living it -- intentionally pacing yourself with a rhythm that suits and honors your life spiritually, mentally and physically.
Though our topic remains essentially the same, let's assume that, rather than the prediction of an apocalypse actually happening, destroying our physical universe, the end of the world meant the demise of long-held, cherished and finally -- at last -- obsolete belief systems.
Is it not refreshing? Is it not all kinds of wonderful to be reminded that all the spittle-flecked hate and hissing resentment in the world still can't defeat intelligence, wisdom, flawed but honest integrity?
While many journalists, philosophers, scientists and lay people debated the significance of the Mayan calendar finishing last December 21, one fact that was consistently overlooked was that the Mayans celebrated the end of their calendar as it was regarded as a new beginning.
As we look at prognostications about the economy and politics of 2030, is it possible that the axis of global culture is also moving to other places, or at least will be more evenly distributed in the decades to come?
It's time for some new predictions! Anything could happen in 2013. Who knows? Maybe the SETI project's radio telescopes will receive an alien transmission and pinpoint the source to that UFO hovering over Donald Trump's head.
"After years of assiduous research, I have come to understand that, approximately 2,100 years ago, there was a severe shortage
Which of these resolutions I break remains to be seen, but if you came up with ten, what do you think your success rate would be?
I'm glad the world did not end so I could enjoy a few days of Forced Family Fun with some pretty awesome adults.
The so-called Mayan Apocalypse didn’t occur, but an ancient temple nearly met its end. Tourists in Guatemala for “end of
Thankfully, the Mayans were wrong and as we gracefully approach 2013, we will face many new beginnings to talk and write about. In addition, holiday time is a natural time to reflect on our past and what brought us to where we are now.