maziar bahari

Maziar Bahari's memoir was the basis of Jon Stewart's film "Rosewater."
Orwell's Thought Police are functioning today in Iran. I know this because my cousin, Shahriar Cyrus, a husband, father of a young son and accomplished painter, was arrested last week in Iran in a similar fashion. Eleven representatives of Iran's Ministry of Intelligence came for him. His crime -- like that of hundreds of others -- was his belief.
For the past two weeks, Gael García Bernal has been making the rounds on TV -- late night shows, morning shows, news programs, and even fake news programs -- to promote his newest film, the Jon Stewart-directed drama Rosewater.
On a regular basis, I see many worse movies out there than Rosewater, Stewart's sometimes affecting, sometimes overly earnest film about an Iranian journalist thrown into solitary confinement by a regime that thinks he's a spy.
For fifteen years, Jon Stewart has been "America's Most Trusted Newsman" as host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show, even as he'd be the first to tell you he's not an actual newsman.
"Rosewater" will be released in the U.S. on Nov. 14th. Stewart said that in the beginning he took a purist approach, but
Hassan Rouhani must hold those who commit human rights violations responsible, including those who arrested Jason Rezaian and Yeganeh Salehi, taking the necessary steps to guarantee their release.
The scenes, featuring "Daily Show" correspondent Jason Jones as himself, recreate the 2009 mock interview with Maziar Bahari
'To Light a Candle' unveils decades of repression, persecution and intimidation against a peaceful community of Iranians whose lives have been dramatically undermined by religious intolerance by the Iranian ruling class.
Celebrity and citizenship proved inseparable when Steven Spielberg presented the "Ambassador for Humanity" award to George Clooney at a gala hosted by Jon Stewart on Thursday night in New York.