Medgar Evers

The Department of the Interior recognized 24 new sites on Wednesday.
(Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures) Baldwin was born in Harlem in 1924. He moved to Paris around 1950, eventually taking
Today, as we are celebrating Dr. King, let's take a minute and reflect on his life, but also rededicate ourselves to stopping the cycle of violence. We can disagree with one another, but rather than pulling the trigger we should have a conversation.
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Vernon Dahmer being killed by the Ku Klux Klan. On January 9, 1966, Vernon Dahmer announced on the radio that he would pay the poll tax for anyone who could not afford to register to vote.
The idea that gays and lesbians should be included really isn't all that new. It's been there in the Constitution this whole time. The Constitution's just been waiting for us to catch up to it.
Make no mistake, there truly are ghosts in Mississippi. Most often, they inhabit long forgotten places and toil with hopes that their mortal lives have not been lived in vain. A few years ago, I first traveled to a forgotten place to meet a forgotten man.
There is a "people's history" of Selma that we all can learn from -- one that is needed especially now.
Fifty years separate the events in the film and the headlines of 2014 and it feels as though little has changed.
Every life matters. When someone is murdered, the loss cannot be measured. Hearing the grief, the real despair about the future in this country for African Americans expressed after the announcement of the Jordan Davis verdict made me think about the past.
As we celebrate the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., we wanted to acknowledge some under-appreciated activists
Phil Robertson thought he was a TV star. Now he's in trouble.The concern is his remarks about homosexuals. Bigotry, worthy of the utmost condemnation? Absolutely. But less noticed were his comments about race.
I hope, as we remember a young President, that we will renew our commitment to building with urgency and persistence a just America where every child is valued and enabled to achieve their God given potential regardless of the lottery of birth.
Anniversaries are often that occasion when a spark of hope for the future is renewed in the hearts of individuals, a community, or a nation. People, whose lives have been touched near and far, pay their momentary tribute and respect.
After the terrorist attack on 9-11 and the nation's response, anger and grief overwhelmed artist Robert Shetterly.
Charming, self-deprecatingly funny, linguistically awesome, LeLand Gantt imbues every word that falls from his mouth with all the passion and poignancy of a preacher speaking the Gospel. You will find truth and triumph in Rhapsody in Black.
On September 30th friends and supporters of the Children's Defense Fund (CDF) will gather at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. to celebrate CDF's 40th anniversary and honor our best known alum, Hillary Rodham Clinton.
Politicians and commentators from across the ideological spectrum like to invoke the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, as well as Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. But it's too easy to breeze past the March's painful historical context.
I remember as if it were yesterday. I had flown from my home in Detroit to Jackson, Miss., for the funeral of Medgar Evers, the African-American civil rights leader who was working as a field secretary for the NAACP in 1963.
What happened these last couple days trumps all that dumb "ish." At first I was upset at the SCOTUS, then I started to get