media representation

The true diversity of the Asian community is glorious.
It is time for us to be the stars of the coming-to-age movies and not just the sidekicks or comedic relief. Give the next generation of movie-watcher a chance to experience us the way that we see ourselves; as quirky, cool and sometimes awkward individuals that have a passion for random things.
For the last five weeks I've anxiously awaited Monday nights and relished the opportunity to sink back into my younger years. So, you can imagine how much it pains me to write this blog.
Ampikaipakan points are not only flawed, but incredibly problematic and inconsiderate. Making cases that suggest diversity is an opponent to universality is such a dangerous oxymoron.
As I reflect on the year behind and the year to come, the greatest lesson I've learned and I want to impart is the need to control our own narrative across all facets of our digitally connected lives both in our fiction and IRL (in real life).
There is one artistic voice that stands out above the rest as pivotal to the national conversation around race, identity and social justice. That is the voice of John Jennings, visual artist pioneer and author.
Shows like Scandal, Black-ish and Fresh Off the Boat lead the way to a more diverse TV landscape. Outside of the U.S., however, there's still much more work to be done.
Even though our reality is full of individuals who are deaf/HoH, only a handful of this population has been given an opportunity to join the cast of a reality TV show. They don't fit into the "reality" that producers are trying to create, and that is a shame for all of us.
While mainstream media still struggles to integrate diversity into programming, the internet offers a vastly different experience. People around the globe, of all backgrounds and abilities, are uploading original new content every day, smashing boring stereotypes and changing the way we view different cultures.
We do not need other people to take their cameras and claim to know what the world looks like through our eyes. We do not need others to speak over us, pretending to tell our stories, when we have our own voices and our own cameras and are fully capable of documenting our lives.
In this day and age, many people are constantly exposed to all sorts of media texts, television series, films, music videos, social media, news and radio programs, etc., and are surrounded with images that help shape the way they view different groups of people.
Yes! Each of these women has created powerful narratives that have helped to boost the representation of black women in media
The same mindset that marks trans people as unfit to share and depict their own stories comes from the same place as the invalidation that causes us to experience discrimination and self-loathing on so many other levels. Seeing your true self in media is important and can save lives.
There is a stigma that is rampant in our society towards mental illness. Yet it is worse for communities of color. I want my community to know that this is not something to be ashamed about. This is not a white person's disease.
I will show my children Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra, not only because they are fantastic stories and shows, but because they will hopefully see themselves in one way or another in either show.
The best part isn't that all of these different types of people are included in these shows. It's that their differences aren't harped on, over and over again.
Moira Walley-Beckett took home the award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series for "Breaking Bad," Gail Mancuso snagged
A blanket of dismal expectancy shrouds every new festival or high profile EDM show. It arrives in the form of a vulture; a hovering media presence eyeing any opportunity to snatch up crumbs of information to then instigate "conversations" where dance music culture and its fans are berated, over and over again.
Hollywood may have retired blackface and other racist caricatures, but discrimination is alive and well.