medical error

An investigation reveals alarming reports of patient deaths and serious injuries tied to software glitches and user errors in record-keeping systems across the country.
We have a long way to go in assessing -- and addressing -- the safety and efficacy of electronic medical records.
If you or a loved one has ever been seriously injured or ill, you probably understand how important it is to have a doctor
Nightmare stories of nurses giving potent drugs meant for one patient to another and surgeons removing the wrong body parts
Patient empowerment is a crucial part of the solution.
Now is the time for medical communities everywhere to examine existing processes critically, pursue thoughtful advances in how we deliver care, and promote a culture that engages staff in the improvement process. Taking care of patients is not only about the therapies we provide but also having the most effective care delivery systems possible. By that metric, American health care still has significant room to grow.
Medical error prevention is a work in progress. We should be impatient with the pace of progress, as Doroshaw is, because it means that patients are daily suffering avoidable harm. But we should also seek to understand the reasons why the pace isn't faster.
While caring for Ms. A overnight, I made the incorrect decision to administer a cardiac medication to treat her disease that is known to increase the risk of bleeding during surgery. Committing and dealing with a medical error is one of the more humbling experiences in the field of medicine.
Yet unlike medical errors, clinical inertia goes mostly unreported and under the radar. That's why it's up to you to be mindful whether your provider is providing treatment and recommendations in your best interest.