medical errors

A May 2016 Johns Hopkins study indicates that 10 percent of all U.S. deaths are due to medical error, making it the third leading cause of death, behind only heart disease and cancer.
Suppose two jumbo jets crashed every day, killing a total of about 365,000 people in a year. Remarkably enough that's about the level of carnage caused every year in our country by avoidable medical mistakes.
As written, the guidance raises very serious questions about the future availability of safe dietary supplements recommended
Since the number doesn't seem to be moving, reason suggests that powerful forces are holding the stasis. What are the barriers
Recently, investigators at Johns Hopkins Medical Center updated those 1999 figures. They reviewed 4 studies of patients from
I got no response the first query. I waited 3 or 4 days and wrote back, reminding him of my initial query, and that I remained
People will surely remember 2016 for the shakeup of the political establishment. Now comes a shakeup of the medical establishment.
The question: Is it smart for the integrative health and medicine movement to abandon the radicalism of calling for an "alternative medicine"?
If even a short part of the end of your interaction feels especially positive to the patient it will positively color the whole experience. Consequently, when you first meet the patient and in your parting comments:
Though as an M.D. I did pass through the ranks of "short coat" to "earn" a long coat and be considered a medical authority, and I loved my medical training at Yale, I prefer my authority to come across in what I know and share.
Before I describe these changes, I would be remiss if I did not explain why these changes are so urgent. A laboratory is
Too many doctors have gotten into the habit of treating lab tests, not patients. And doctors have become super-specialized, each one focusing only on one specific organ system and the specIfic meds used to treat it.
Noe Martínez Sandino is the third writer in CIVIC's series of blog posts called "Words Beyond Walls." He was deported earlier this month to Costa Rica. These are his words beyond walls.
Regardless of your political persuasion, there are some facts about the health care industry that are not well known to the general public but are key to the realization that the system is broken and that change is desperately needed.
Now is the time for medical communities everywhere to examine existing processes critically, pursue thoughtful advances in how we deliver care, and promote a culture that engages staff in the improvement process. Taking care of patients is not only about the therapies we provide but also having the most effective care delivery systems possible. By that metric, American health care still has significant room to grow.
We live in a world where as many as 440,000 Americans die each year because of preventable medical mistakes. With Prop 46, California voters can do what the politicians and the status-quo crowd won't: Nudge our healthcare system toward safer practices, deter doctor substance abuse and hold negligent physicians accountable.
Finger pointing and outrage will get us know nowhere. We need to start by humbly admitting what we do not know, and then asking what is known to work. Then, maybe 21 days after the nation's last domestic case of Ebola, we can start to go back to alarm instead of panic.