medical malpractice

While ACA repeal/replace plans currently remain "a vague list of not-always-coherent ideas", they all share one big idea. Each ACA replacement bill would deprive every patient in America of legal rights guaranteed by their state and local governments.
Nearly 3 million Americans go under the knife each year, The Washington Post reports. Some of these surgeries are elective
If someone of a CDC/IDSA centric view were to have confirmation bias, they may interpret this data as a wake-up call to better
Once you've figured out a patient's wiring, and the overlapping factors on the MSIDS map causing inflammation, you can get
As the protections of tort law -- the law of wrongful injuries -- are diminished, millions of Americans are left outside the civil justice system -- unable to hold perpetrators accountable. The forced under-utilization of consumer, environmental and worker protection laws by their supposed beneficiaries against violators is overwhelmingly the norm.
Legal action though the commonest route taken must be undergone with utmost care. If you are considering legal action, then here are a few considerations you must have at the back of your mind.
I'm not going to share the details of my personal experience, but I will tell you that second opinions are a great way to avoid unnecessary medical procedures. A second opinion probably saved my life years ago, and I am now skeptical any time I hear someone talk about surgery.
It's been two decades and lawmakers in Indiana have voted in favor of a controversial medical malpractice cap.
The likes of voluntary sterilization and embryo screening give people who can afford them greater measures of control over procreation.Except, that is, when reproductive professionals make mistakes that frustrate efforts to pursue or avoid pregnancy or parenthood.
They've been fighting this uphill battle on their own, like soldiers carrying us on their backs, for decades. While they
Dr. Neil Spector is a leader in applying translational research to the clinical development of molecularly targeted personalized cancer therapies. Here, he shares his story, explains what Lyme and cancer have in common, and encourages us with his vision for the future.
He listened for 10 minutes and calmly said, "You have Lyme. Lyme does all kinds of weird things, but you'll get better. Amazing that I am only the 12th doctor you've been to. Most find me somewhere between 20 and 100."
Eliezer Nussbaum, M.D. is one of America's most respected doctors, having founded the Miller Children's Hospital Pediatric
If only the people who engage in "road rage" would engage in "corporate rage" when they are harmed by cover-ups or hazardous products and gouging services, aloof CEOs would start getting serious about safety and fair play.
An outdated Supreme Court doctrine and congressional loophole leaves servicewomen unable to recover for the negligent prenatal care they receive in a military hospital. However egregious the malpractice and grave the suffering it causes, our law offers no recourse for the wrong done to the woman's procreative interest and to her child's physical and mental wellbeing.
The bottom line is that no health care system is perfect. Doctors are human beings and therefore subject to imperfection.
I know we doctors can do a better job and it is time that we reform our own behavior. We can change health care for the better if we are willing to change ourselves first.
When a state 'caps' non-economic damages, politicians have essentially decided to value the destruction of someone's life by what that person would have earned in the marketplace, since lost earning are never 'capped.' This promotes a kind of caste system.
Now is the time to catch up with 1975. All eyes are on California voters when it comes to addressing the ongoing crisis of medical malpractice in the United States. Whereas MICRA served as a bad example to the nation, let us now reverse the tide and set out on a positive path.