mediterranean migrant crisis

What if you had to make a decision between continuing to work as a child laborer to make ends meet for your family or planning to risk the choppy waters and dangerous journey of taking a refugee boat from Turkey to Greece? This is the dilemma of Shrivan, a 16-year-old boy who fled Aleppo, Syria three years ago to southern Turkey.
Germany, one of the biggest supporters of the refugee crisis, is allowing some 800,000 people into the country this year. Unfortunately, its refugee centers are nearing capacity, and many are in need of repair. This is a look at Schwäbisch Gmünd in the Ostalbkreis district, beyond the fence into the homes of the refugees who live there.
BERLIN -- Only a month since German Chancellor Angela Merkel opened the country to a historic influx of refugees, Germans have begun to worry about the limits of their country's capacities. And talk of integration brings up an even larger question: how does a country afraid of national identity present itself to newcomers?
The America that I grew up in is one that also raised refugee children. It wasn't always easy to embrace foreigners -- and traumatized ones at that -- and it took a monetary investment, but from a distance of 40 years, we can clearly see how that investment paid off multifold. It is not only the distress of refugees that must capture our hearts, but the potential of resettlement that should engage our minds.
As he stacks up dozens of empty baking trays in the back of his van after another morning round of helping to feed refugees, one thing is certain: the "Baker in Kos" clearly remembers from where he came.
This is a bigger problem than allowing people in. This is a bigger problem than resettlement. The problem is at the source. We are witnessing the destruction of a country.
STOCKHOLM -- Although not every nation might share the peculiar "moral" self-image of Sweden, every nation ought to remember that a Europe that was once unable or unwilling to shoulder and share its human responsibilities and legal obligations towards those seeking its protection, soon became a Europe unable to prevent its own moral and political self-degradation and self-destruction.
BERLIN -- What we are witnessing today is the first of the long predicted "migration of nations," a circumstance that in itself has the capacity to change many realities we all grew up with. Mass emigration on this order has been predicted as a result of climate change, droughts and dearth. But this exodus is due to a terrible war that is shaking up an already roiling region -- the Middle East.
BUDAPEST -- Hungarian authorities have blamed the current situation on Europe's misguided approach to migration in general and -- opening a new front in their anti-EU rhetoric -- on Germany in particular. But much of the chaos we are witnessing is, in fact, intentionally manufactured by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán himself.
"History will remember them as the survivors. The weak are those who try to stop them, but can’t."
Sometimes, I just want to wake up from this nightmare. Is this really the country in which I want to raise my child? It is a country that I haven't known until now?
LONDON -- We live in a period in which we no longer have a unipolar or bipolar world, we don't even have a multipolar world; it's kind of a chaotic world where power relations have become unclear. When power relations are unclear, impunity and unpredictability tend to prosper. That, I believe, is the reality behind the high levels of displacement that are taking place in today's world.
COPENHAGEN -- The most revolutionary idea of modern Europe has been to purse the safety of its citizens by opening borders, not erecting barriers. A new European security strategy must make the case that the nexus of security and integration still amount to the formula of European peace. That is a battle that Europe cannot afford to lose.
BERLIN -- The combination of Grexit and Brexit, and its consequences not just for the stability of the eurozone, but for the continued existence of the EU, is probably the greatest danger that Europe has faced since the Cold War's end.
"Europe is declaring war on smugglers" the EU's top migration official said last month. As the Mediterranean fills with boats and the bodies of migrants from Africa and the Arab world, it is inopportune language like this underlines how grave a situation we find ourselves in and how far away a humane solution seems.
EU foreign ministers are expected to approve on Monday plans for a naval and air mission in the Mediterranean, based in Italy
A photo of the newborn girl from the Italian navy's Press Office, May 4, 2015. (Italian Navy via AP) Europe has struggled