mediterranean migrant crisis

Germany, one of the biggest supporters of the refugee crisis, is allowing some 800,000 people into the country this year. Unfortunately, its refugee centers are nearing capacity, and many are in need of repair. This is a look at Schwäbisch Gmünd in the Ostalbkreis district, beyond the fence into the homes of the refugees who live there.
BERLIN -- Only a month since German Chancellor Angela Merkel opened the country to a historic influx of refugees, Germans have begun to worry about the limits of their country's capacities. And talk of integration brings up an even larger question: how does a country afraid of national identity present itself to newcomers?
The America that I grew up in is one that also raised refugee children. It wasn't always easy to embrace foreigners -- and traumatized ones at that -- and it took a monetary investment, but from a distance of 40 years, we can clearly see how that investment paid off multifold. It is not only the distress of refugees that must capture our hearts, but the potential of resettlement that should engage our minds.
As he stacks up dozens of empty baking trays in the back of his van after another morning round of helping to feed refugees, one thing is certain: the "Baker in Kos" clearly remembers from where he came.
This is a bigger problem than allowing people in. This is a bigger problem than resettlement. The problem is at the source. We are witnessing the destruction of a country.
STOCKHOLM -- Although not every nation might share the peculiar "moral" self-image of Sweden, every nation ought to remember that a Europe that was once unable or unwilling to shoulder and share its human responsibilities and legal obligations towards those seeking its protection, soon became a Europe unable to prevent its own moral and political self-degradation and self-destruction.
BERLIN -- What we are witnessing today is the first of the long predicted "migration of nations," a circumstance that in itself has the capacity to change many realities we all grew up with. Mass emigration on this order has been predicted as a result of climate change, droughts and dearth. But this exodus is due to a terrible war that is shaking up an already roiling region -- the Middle East.
BUDAPEST -- Hungarian authorities have blamed the current situation on Europe's misguided approach to migration in general and -- opening a new front in their anti-EU rhetoric -- on Germany in particular. But much of the chaos we are witnessing is, in fact, intentionally manufactured by Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán himself.
"History will remember them as the survivors. The weak are those who try to stop them, but can’t."