megacities

The world has entered a new geological era, the Anthropocene, and over the last few generations humanity has witnessed revolutionary changes in our biosphere. But what about the next few generations? What will happen for human life on Earth?
The demand for access to digital isn't just about making things more convenient. A study shows that access to technology and information changes behaviors in ways that help our environment and quality of life.
Aside from global aging, one of the greatest global trends in 21st century life is urbanization. America industrialized and urbanized in the late 19th century and early 20th and then pioneered suburbanization. But, globally the story is very different. The world is urbanizing rapidly.
Despite history, geography and culture, there are extraordinary systematic regularities and constraints that transcend the individuality of cities.
What can we expect from Abu Dhabi that will benefit dialogue and progress on global health? This global reality is reflected
Mexico City was once known for its smoggy landscape with industrial eyesores such as the 18 de Marzo Refinery spewing ozone
Booming urbanization abroad provides enormous opportunities for American business. Our embassies and consulates, and officials in Washington, are proactively facilitating the commercial outreach efforts of U.S. companies to rapidly growing cities, states and provinces.
Megacities create megaproblems. Say "cities" and the negative associations come cascading out: noise, dirt, housing projects, shantytowns, concrete, crowding, crime, drugs, pollution, gridlock, stress, alienation. But they also spur people to figure out megasolutions.