Mek

Trump clearly has no intention of defeating terrorism.
A new, more moderate regime, the Iranian amen choir chant, will surely emerge. Just give it time. The great Iranian gamble
Last month I had the privilege of answering an interview from an Iranian research agency dedicated to studying acts of terror carried out against the Iranian people. By their count 17,000 Iranians have been killed in acts of terror over the last 3 1/2 decades. Quite an astounding number, isn't it?
Supporters of the nuclear negotiations with Iran suspect that hawks both in Congress and abroad feel the same way as Rajavi
WASHINGTON -- In what has become an all-too-familiar sight on Capitol Hill, at least a half-dozen members of the exiled Iranian
One would have thought that Iraq's Prime Minister Maliki's government had enough on its hands, what with a calamitous escalation of sectarian strife harkening back to the worst days of Iraq's bloody and traumatic post-Saddam days. I was wrong.
The MEK have been very keen to publicize a Library of Congress report called "Iran's Ministry of Intelligence and Security: A Profile." On the surface this is understandable, as the MEK is the sworn enemy of the Islamic Republic of Iran. However, a closer look at the content reveals a murkier truth.
Freed from the pretended constraints of being listed as a terrorist entity in the USA, the Mojahedin-e Khalq has stepped up its financial and money laundering activities in Western countries.
I've been reporting on the MEK for The Huffington Post since last summer, and members of the group have threatened my house and hacked my email. Still, I believe the State Department's decision Friday to remove the MEK from the list of Foreign Terrorist Organizations was a good one.
The Iraqi government wants hundreds of MEK members to leave the camp and, ultimately, the country. MEK members first found