meltdowns

It can be seen at any long grocery store line-up: the older brother starts pestering the younger sister who is asking the parent for the 27th time to please buy them that sugar-loaded treat. The parent is becoming increasingly exasperated.
As parents, we all know they're going to happen. Meltdowns. The red-faced, snot-covered, tear-smeared emotional overloads that happen to our children, causing them to temporarily malfunction and drive parents to want to hide in the closet with a bottle of anything alcoholic.
Every child is different, but toddlers come in similar packages. As parents, we have control over our children's environment. Anticipating what may cause a meltdown can help avoid one.
Avoid finger pointing. When you make a mistake, admit it -- without trying to say it was because of what someone did or didn't do. When we show our children what it looks like to take full responsibility for our actions, they are much more likely to freely admit when they've made a mistake.
I am that mom, and these are strangely some of the most sacred moments of parenting. When it isn't easy -- but it's still so good. When God reveals himself to me through my boys. I think back to that mom that I judged from years ago, and I understand important things about life I didn't know then. I'm grateful for the shift in perspective.
If there is something important happening; if there is something worth seeing or reading or hearing out there, some kind soul or a thousand of them will make sure we see it by sharing it on social media.
At the other end of the aisle was a young mother, her back to me. She raised her arms to her head, holding it for a moment, and then pressed her hands to her eyes, her back straight and shoulders tensed. A young boy was busy pulling a box of cereal from the stroller in front her.
I'm not claiming "No Biggy!" is foolproof, but it's definitely been an effective tool for everyone in our family. Sometimes, a little levity is all you need to change your perspective.
By necessity, caring adults need to become detectives, analyzing what is taking place before the behavior (whether crying, screaming, biting, kicking, or running from the classroom) and how the environment either reinforces the behavior or helps to change it.