mental disorders

Look left, look right, look in front of you, look behind you, and look in the mirror. One of you is affected by a mental health condition. Each year millions of Americans are facing the reality of a mental disorder of different nature and severity.
Research from the emerging field of nutritional psychiatry indicates that mental disorders will continue to rise globally in the future.
When people like Roy Moore want us to believe drag queens are disordered, these gals remind us that drag is strength, drag is courage, drag is tenacity. When you hold our community down, drag can be loud and effective in making change.
Police officers often lack the training to approach the mentally unstable. This lack of training, of course, makes little sense, given the significant size and possible threat of that very population -- of an estimated eight million Americans living with severe mental illness, half are untreated.
It is reminder to stop and think. A reminder to keep going as you have so much to be grateful for. It is reminder than you are not merely a silhouette, but a voice that is meant to be heard. What many fail to understand is that they are not alone, and talking about it is not a crime. On the contrary, it can be your savior.
We should welcome all that psychiatry can do to help those whose desires push them to act in ways that wound others. But
It's not something that I can control or just change whenever I want to. If I could just choose not to be anxious, I would. Since I can't, I've had to find ways to cope with it. I've found that meditation is the biggest help in calming my anxiety.
Countless media outlets have speculated strongly that mental illness -- particularly depression -- may have been the cause of the Germanwings tragedy. Here's why this troubling: It highlights the media's -- and by extension our society's -- tendency to view mental health difficulties as permanent.
It's like one by one, each and every stimulus around you takes over your mind and body. One by one, a sound or a feeling or a visual will become so engulfing that that one stimulus becomes your entire reality. That one thing becomes every thought that goes through your mind and every physical and emotional feeling you have.
It may seem like your life is turned upside down. But trust me: it's not. In seven years I've been hospitalized three times for a total of 32 days. Each hospitalization has taught me more about myself. And luckily, each hospital stay has gotten shorter. Meaning, I'm recovering at faster rates.
There's a huge emphasis placed on how we cope with stress, anxiety and mental health challenges in our lives. Everyone has a different way of determining the difference between release and reinforcement.
According to the CDC, only 25 percent of people who suffer from mental health symptoms feel that people are caring and sympathetic toward people struggling with mental illness. If so many people are battling these issues, why should they be a secret?
The actor's death should be a springboard for opening up the dialogue on what depression is really all about.
One line of criticism holds that the DSM focuses too much on superficial symptoms of mental disorders, ignoring underlying dynamics. Instead of focusing on and naming clinical syndromes, critics say, the manual (and the field) ought to target the specific, disordered cognitive processes that underlie labels.
Whenever a person with a mental disorder (or assumed to have a mental disorder), veteran or civilian, commits a violent act that makes headlines, there is a call to address the "mental health issue" in violent crimes. However, what is meant by the "mental health issue" is generally unclear. The fact is that killings and overall violence are extremely rare by people with serious mental illness.
Recognition of mental illness as a profound public health problem that affects productivity and, therefore, a threat to the economy of nations; and that in a world where economies are rapidly becoming "brain-based."
Answers to this puzzle are more known than is generally appreciated. Taking an approach that identifies and addresses risk and protective factors in violence, whether it be directed against the self or others, is one thing we can do right now.
With the increase in organizational capacities utilizing social media, and the lessons learnt from the recent occupy movements, adolescents of today are in an excellent position to spur youth-led activism.
It's easier to help a person stay alive and open the dialogue on reasons to live slowly, with a delicate pair of pliers, rather than the sledgehammer of "suicide is a sin."
In a new video (seen above) released by a Canadian news program, "The Agenda with Steve Paikin," Cantor describes his work