merida initiative

"We are more powerful when we empower each other."
Given all the electoral noise surrounding "big beautiful walls" and calls for mass deportations of the alleged rapists and other criminals streaming across the U.S.-Mexico border, it is very easy to lose track of one simple and powerful fact: no relationship affects the United States more than our relationship with Mexico.
The missing 43 students and escape of "El Chapo" Guzmán may partly explain why the U.S. is slashing aid to Mexico.
"This is going to be a tough week for Mexico on human rights."
On Jan. 27, then-Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam came out with the government's version of events in Iguala, Guerrero on the terrible night of Sept. 26 when six people were murdered and 43 students disappeared.
Our government should respect our own principles and laws on human rights and democracy, as well as Mexicans' efforts to save their nation from the abyss into which it's fallen.
The latest analysis of Edward Snowden's leaked documents by the German magazine Der Spiegel is a bombshell for Mexico.
Whatever its scenic attractions, Costa Rica has been touched by the ever widening war on drugs which has engulfed Central America and Mexico. As I reported as early as three years ago, smugglers use Costa Rica as a transshipment point for drugs coming from Colombia and Panama.
Building on the lessons of the past five years, the United States should work with Mexico to implement the nonmilitary programs envisioned in the current Merida framework.
We in the U.S. must do our part to build a future of human rights and human dignity throughout the Americas, and call on Mexico to protect its indigenous communities and the advocates like Vidulfo Rosales who risk everything to defend them.