metadata

As the news broke on March 7, 2016, that U.S. drone strikes had killed 150 people in Somalia, the White House announced it will reveal, for the first time, the number of people killed by drones and manned airstrikes "outside areas of active hostilities" since 2009. This is a critical first step toward much-needed transparency. But it will not go far enough.
Silicon Valley celebrated last fall when the White House revealed it would not seek legislation forcing technology makers
So despite the fact that some of the Republican debaters were up in arms about it, the USA Freedom Act actually has produced only very marginal gains for privacy. The current state of affairs is mostly depressing, especially in light of the floodlight on these issues gifted to us by Snowden.
In an age of too many laws, too many prisons, too many government spies, and too many corporations eager to make a fast buck at the expense of the American taxpayer, there is no safe place and no watertight alibi.
Clinton critics are asking whether relevant data may have been deleted from a private email server. Understanding such accusations requires some background in computer forensics and the ways that files are stored, accessed, deleted, and recovered.
There was a time when the internet highway wasn't clogged the way it is now. These days everyone has a website; even the family dog has a social media account to showcase his latest, greatest, doggy accomplishment.
Following months of rumors, it's been revealed that Privacy and National Security were secretly married weeks ago in Las Vegas, Nevada. "We're tired of all the naysayers constantly describing us as incompatible. We'll show you. We'll show you all! Ha!" the couple wrote.
Congress has four days left in its current session to decide whether to reauthorize Section 215, amend it or let it die a natural death on June 1, 2015 (the date on which it will sunset if not reauthorized).
Whether it's the NSA, European intelligence agencies, private corporations, or the police, Katarzyna Szymielewicz is deeply concerned about the erosion of privacy and civil rights. We talked about how she became involved in this work, how Polish politicians have reacted to surveillance issues, and why Snowden deserves the EU's Sakharov Prize.
Data is the fundamental basis for our lives today. Future generations will able to look back at all our data -- via sources like Twitter, Facebook -- and paint an accurate picture us. And yet, the vast majority of us simply don't understand how data works.
Using purchase metadata with no credit card numbers, names or any other simple identifiers, the report's co-authors found they could track a specific person's purchases using three factors: a receipt, an Instagram and a Tweet about a new purchase or a Facebook post.
The proposed Act is a huge step forward in our nation's effort to redesign our surveillance programs to protect the privacy of American citizens without sacrificing the compelling need to protect our national security. This legislation should be signed by the President -- without delay.
The Bill of Rights was designed to protect the People from their government. That's quite literally becoming history today as new challenges, now from local law enforcement, chip away at the Fourth Amendment's protections of privacy.
This decision may well presage how the Court will rule on the constitutionality of the NSA metadata collection program when that issue inevitably comes before it.
Facebook has introduced a new feature for its mobile users allowing them to share their location with friends. It is an "opt in" feature, meaning you don't have to sign up for it. On the surface, it seems to be a useful tool for people to use. But the new Facebook "feature" is pretty dangerous.
It's rare that we ever get a glimpse of how our expanding secret state really works. But every now and then, a single case can suddenly illuminate an otherwise dark landscape.
What if that someone also had, as we know the NSA does, access to your social media, email, snail mail, credit card data, travel information, air reservations, and bank records? Orwell was an amateur. Metadata is the key to stripping away the haystack so that the needle is just sitting there.
Americans are now being tracked as they've never been tracked before. What is normal and accepted these days sounds like a tinfoil-hatted paranoiac's delusion from just a few decades ago, in fact.
Our state of affairs goes against a pinnacle of American justice, equality before law, facilitating everything from war crimes, to torture, to domestic spying, to a predatory, ravenous Wall Street that feeds on the middle class with impunity.