metastatic cancer

www.metup.org Dear Mr. Vice President, This is something that remains a serious problem in cancer land, despite recent advances
Robyn's life gyrates between extremes. One day she is in the courtroom relentlessly pressing a client's case, and the next she may be receiving chemotherapy and be so sick in the aftermath that she can barely stand. Robyn has simply outrun challenges that would flatten most normal people.
I choose to see cancer as a chronic condition. It's something I need to deal with every day. It calls on strengths I never knew that I had. But I don't want to elevate it to some kind of noble calling. At the same time, there's no question it has changed my life and changed the purpose of my life.
Why do we tell the cancer patient "you look great"? Why do we celebrate when a cancer patient doesn't look like Skellator?
A few months prior to her cancer diagnosis, Stephanie noticed an unusual lump forming in her right breast. She didn't really think much of it. It wasn't until months later, while laying in bed, that she felt the lump again. At the time, she was just 31 and had never thought of getting a mammogram until after 40. 24 hours later, Stephanie got the call that would change her life forever.
So in honor of all our sisters and brothers living with known metastatic disease, let us honor their experience while recognizing that theirs is a much bigger club than we have previously acknowledged.
Individuals living with stage IV/metastatic breast cancer don't like October, all the pink hoopla and the countless pink ribbons that appear everywhere. They feel they do not fit the image of the strong, brave and positive-minded warrior in pink.
I have one foot gratefully planted in this world, willfully trying to swim the same tide as everyone around me, and the other foot in The Sick World. A fragile place that after seven years, countless surgeries and thousands of drugs, has left me a wisp of my former self.
When Elena Gitelson began experiencing back pain toward the end of 2012, she did what any hospital doctor might do: took herself to get a CT scan.
Any efforts by the medical profession to curb patient autonomy deserve strict scrutiny lest we return to the unfortunate era of paternalism. And it will not be easy to effect these types of changes.
Please remember Oct. 13 throughout year. Those of us who suffer with Stage IV breast cancer want others to become aware of our disease. In so doing, we may not have to wait another 40 years before finding a cure.
Stage 4 cancer is a condition in which cancer has spread (metastasized) from its original location to other organs in the body.
If you, or someone you care about, ever experience a traumatic loss, never think or utter the words, "You have to let it go and move on." Time does not heal the wounds of trauma.
It used to be the C-word," Moskowitz says. "Nobody said they had cancer. Now it's the M-word nobody mentions. The word is metastatic."