methane emissions

Together, five companies have a climate footprint bigger than Exxon, Shell or BP, but we don't talk about it.
The Trump administration's move is the latest effort to undo much of Barack Obama’s work to address climate change.
An effort to recall a Colorado county commissioner has become a proxy argument over rules to limit methane emissions.
Lockatong Gorge, Kingwood Tonwship, New Jersey She adds that "most people appreciate the safe, affordable, locally produced
The two countries are seeking to improve cooperation on energy after Obama rejected the Keystone XL pipeline project last year.
President Obama gave his final State of the Union this week and in the seven years he's been president, much has changed. But, before he leaves office, there is more that can and should be done to address climate change.
We all make mistakes -- that's why pencils have erasers and renters have insurance. Not all mistakes, however, are equal. If we mess up a math test, we can erase and start over; but if we burn the neighbor's house down, we can't "un-burn" it by labeling it a mistake. Instead, we have to offset our damage by paying to rebuild it.
Such radical gyrations in the climate are already causing unseen suffering and hardship for countless of the earth's inhabitants. Millions of people have been displaced from their homes or lost their livelihoods as a result of one degree of warming.
When California first mandated the widespread addition of renewable energy sources, greenhouse gas emissions have been cut by 100 million tons. Along the way, we have created a thriving green economy that promises only more jobs and more innovation as we reach to do even better.
In a few short months, world delegates will descend on Paris to debate over an acceptable framework on energy policies for their respective countries, one designed to hold global temperatures to a 2C degree increase over preindustrial levels. If this feels like a familiar film, it's because we have been there before.
To understand the impact of these new draft rules, it's important to look at what they do - and what they don't - and measure them against the nation's bold but readily achievable goals set out by the Obama administration earlier this year.
Did EPA hit the mark - will this program achieve real, measurable, verifiable benefits for the environment? Does it fairly recognize and reward those companies that step up to innovate and lead?
While voluntary efforts can be helpful in establishing new technologies or practices, and validating industry's ability to meet regulatory benchmarks, opt-in programs alone are no substitute for effective regulation that will reduce energy waste and better protect public health.
Here we go again. A new set of peer-reviewed scientific papers pointing to 50 percent higher than estimated regional methane emissions from oil and gas operations in Texas were published this week. And like clockwork, the oil and gas industry's public relations machine kicked in.
In an investigation into the funding of the Environmental Defense Fund's (EDF) work on oil and gas regulation, Inside Climate News discovered that a key EDF funder had hired FTI Consulting's David Blackmon to promote fracking regulations. Unbeknownst to his employer, Blackmon is a longtime oil industry consultant who is paid to oppose regulation of the fracking industry.
The recent editorial in The New York Times "A Modest Move on Methane" (January 19, 2015) is spot on in identifying methane
Many cities and states have taken action to curb wasteful -- and harmful -- methane leaks. However, until now a national methane strategy -- and the resources that come along with it -- have been the missing piece.