metropolitan areas

In conventional thinking about the economy, standard assumptions include: Since the beginning of the Great Recession - and
People have been moving away from Canada's largest metropolitan areas (Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver) for the last decade, according to Statistics Canada 2004/5 to 2013/4 data. Canada's patterns of dispersion over the past decade mirror the metropolitan dispersion that is continuing in most high-income world nations.
Even the most affordable metropolitan areas in the country are beyond the reach of millions of American families.
We won't solve the nation's "urban crisis" by labeling it such. Not doing so, however, means that we will not even begin to address in a serious manner those issues that over time could eventually destroy many of our American cities as we have known them.
The common thread among movers is aspiration --- seeking better lives. People move to places they can afford and where they can hope for a higher standard of living.
What does the erosion of the economic and social fabric in these suburbs mean for the future of our metropolitan regions? What does it tell us about the great social experiment in suburbanization altogether?
In the absence of constructive action in Washington, cities and metropolitan areas have emerged as the can-do directors of the nation, taking powerful steps to grow jobs and remake their economies for the long haul.
Higher education and industries that support it are the reason these metropolitan areas are doing well. College towns across
Below are the ten cities with the most job postings according to indeed.com with additional data provided by the Bureau of
The new global knowledge based economy, not to mention our current fiscal crisis, demands that government rethink how to organize itself to be most competitive.