michael chabon

The literary couple spoke out in the wake of the president's remarks on violence in Charlottesville.
by Don Lattin, originally published on californiamag.org Writer Ayelet Waldman was teaching a class on drug policy reform
Pulitzer and National Book Critics Circle winners call out Trump’s “nativism and bigotry.”
More Recommendations from Off the Shelf: Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann On a hot summer day in 1974, Philippe Petit
By Erin Flaaen | Off the Shelf The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman According to the ancient historian Josephus, nearly 2,000
During a respite from a recent international development conference in Mbale, Uganda I had a glimpse of a Jewish story that sounded like a Michael Chabon "What if" plot.
If we take apart the motivations and rationales and biographies of some of the leading exponents of plastic realism, we find that their official personas match the ideal neoliberal subject being constituted in their works.
The suspense builds inexorably as Simon struggles to find his child, while clinging to the belief his son is not a cold-blooded killer.
From start to finish, Uptown Special offers a hugely fresh alternative to what we've come to expect from the music industry in the last few years.
The piece of writing advice that is always debated: "Write what you know." Naturally, if writers followed that advice every time then bookshelves would be full of books about writers. Then there are novels about writers that challenge that statement, stories about writers that truly stand out.
Then Junot Diaz asked me a question: "What could you possibly write that would interest people?" This being a reference to my age, and possibly my closed-off suburban background. I know that it was not meant as an insult, but at the same time, how would he know if my writing could interest people just by looking at me?
But then you come to part III, which is one sentence that goes on for 12 pages (no, that is not a typo). I'm not sure what Chabon was trying to accomplish with this non-sentence. But having been forewarned, I simply skipped over it.
While Looking for Alaska may not be as amazing as The Fault in Our Stars, it's still awesome and you should read it.
I'm inspired by all sorts of things. I get really excited about new projects, researching, and finding solutions for them
I'm at Pizzaiolo on Telegraph Avenue, in the Temescal district of Oakland. It's 8 a.m. -- the exact minute the restaurant opens -- and Michael Chabon apologizes profusely for the early hour.
A warning first: There will be no high-school essayist's hunt for symbols (the green light of Daisy's dock, Dr. Eckleburg's big eyes that see all).
After all, it takes a certain level of confidence to send something out, because even if it's wonderful, nine times out of ten, it's going to come back. Male writers I've known don't take this personally, they just send the work right back out there and guess what? Eventually it gets published.
Before the crowded room of gregarious, well-read rabbis from around the country, Kahn asked Chabon to narrate his own Jewish coming-of-age.