Michael Moss

Of course the challenge is unrelenting; we have never confronted it. The current (June 7, 2016) issue of the Journal of the
Conclusions about diet study outcomes that are this precarious, that can be worked just a bit, and flipped -- are utterly useless. They are propaganda.
What the New York Times tells us today, no surprise to those of us who have worked directly with severely obese patients over the years, is that failure overtakes the show participants, too. Those of us in these trenches have known all along that though challenging, weight loss is rarely the rate-limiting problem.
Similarly, I don't think we can say that historical advice about diet, health and weight control -- whatever the historical era, or advice -- is wrong because people subject to a diet of willfully addictive junk foods failed to follow it.
A commentary just out in JAMA says many reasonable things about diet and health. The author notes that the overall low quality of the prevailing American diet is an anchor on life expectancy itself. Amen to that.
Even for someone who spends as much time in the diet war trenches as I do, the barrage of the past week has been noteworthy for its intensity, and its implications -- both exceptionally hopeful, and dire.<
We are a uniquely adaptable species. It has led us into trouble that imperils ourselves, and our planet alike. There are early indications of hope that it could lead us out as well.
How, then, is it even possible to propagate the myth of prevailing cluelessness about the basic care and feeding of Homo
Calories count. But of course, so does the quality of food. The fallacy propagated by a noisome minority is that there is
Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center; Griffin Hospital There is vulnerability, and demonstrated liability