Michel Martelly

Hoping for that result, there will be a noon rally and march in Brooklyn, NY on Saturday February 4 at the Grand Army Plaza
Many people were surprised at the results of last week's election. In hindsight, the signs were there to be seen, in plain sight. Many, either because they were paying attention or being targeted, were not surprised.
Political scientist Robert Fatton Jr. explains the deep-rooted challenges Haiti's next leader will face.
The first day of Haiti's carnival was cancelled due to unrest.
Research conducted in 2014, when the Agritrans project took over the land, demonstrated a negative impact to small and medium
The security lapses, violence, disorganization and irregularities of the August 9 Haitian elections had been preordained by the U.S. subversion of these long overdue elections. The result has been further destabilization of Haiti.
The truth is that no one will ever be privy to the complete correspondences on Hillary Clinton's server, but there is more than enough information available to discuss how the United States conducts corrupt foreign policy in Haiti.
A series of commemoration activities on Tuesday for 100 years of U.S. Occupation organized by the Mouvman Patriyotik Demokratik Popilè (the Patriotiic, Democratic, People's Movement) carried the theme, "with or without boots, the occupation still exists."
Cuba is an example of failed communism; Haiti of failed capitalism. If either country is to progress, it will have to significantly change its political and economic system.
I hear the Dalai Lama would disagree with me on this, but my husband and I toasted to the death of former Haitian dictator
It's time to end the campaign of attacks against Jean-Bertrand Aristide and Fanmi Lavalas once and for all. Aristide, like all Haitian citizens, must be allowed to participate in politics without fear and intimidation being the norm.
Secretary of State John Kerry just pulled off a compromise to save Afghanistan's elections from yielding widespread violence. He might considering doing the same in Haiti. Here's why.
With each passing year the incredible stories of heroism give way to ones of failure. As we've seen, stories about suffering sadly tend to get more eyeballs than those of progress and lessons learned.
Three years and $6 billon later, we remain with the same questions and a very troubling report about USAID from CEPR. The big question remains. Who is capable of charting the way forward for Haiti?
As governments and international organizations continue to invest in Haiti's future, we must have the humility to admit that we don't have all the answers. Let's heed the advice that knowledge lives with people on the ground -- not within the bowels of bureaucracies.
Despite the eroding of hope when confronted with the immense challenge of governing Haiti and his own missteps, Haitians still seem to be giving President Michel Martelly the benefit of the doubt.
It was recently reported that work on neighborhood revitalization in Port-au-Prince is about to finally begin. This is both welcome and long overdue, since more progress needs to be made in neighborhood revitalization.
President Martelly must recognize that the future prosperity of the Haitian people will not come from an association with the world's despots but with the hard work of fighting corruption, creating opportunities and educating his people.