michelle alexander

Kyle Dargan What sorts of books am I talking about? Novels like Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser or The Rise of Silas Lapham
So I see the knees being taken, the fists being raised, and the embraces being offered as the continuation of Heschel's praying
These recommendations are offered (again) with love, not one ounce of blame, gratitude for anyone making even the tiniest effort to affect positive change, and hope for a better understanding in the not-so-distant future.
However, America's mass incarceration is an incredibly large problem beyond Black people. The International Centre for Prison
I hope we don't soon forget what silence felt like when hatred was directed at us, and instead reach back through that door. In this legacy-defining moment, what choice will you make?
The vast majority of the foreign policy concern for the 2016 elections has been centered on the Middle East, but I think
The Facebook guru recommended 23 books everyone should read in a lifetime, but it’s shockingly male-centric.
Far too many pundits in this country claim we need more moderate politicians, which to them means some kind of carefully calibrated average of two extreme positions.
I truly believe that we are going to see a true melting pot that is the Sanders campaign. This is not the campaign of the establishment. This is not the campaign for the advantaged. This is the campaign for those who have had enough.
Hillary Clinton loves black people. And black people love Hillary—or so it seems. Black politicians have lined up in droves
State officials in New York are reforming their policy of keeping people convicted of non-violent offenses in solitary confinement. Some hail the decision; others, including corrections officers, object, saying that solitary confinement is necessary to maintain control, and they say that keeping an individual in solitary confinement is not inhumane.
In short, the injustice of mass incarceration is something everyone should be aware of and talking about. The impact it is having not only on inmates but also on their partners and families is a discussion we cannot continue to leave out.
The President can and must do more. There are at least two things in his executive authority and at least one or two more things that he must call on Congress to do in order to meet the challenge of the hour.
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Lamarche and Christie agree on Marriage Equality and Charlie Hebdo but, like the country, divide on why it's the fire this time in Baltimore. Will we have recurring police-triggered violence -- from Harlem in 1930s to Ferguson and Baltimore today -- or can government reduce both police violence and urban pathologies?

It is astonishing that someone so bright and well-intentioned does not see the hypocrisy in calling taxes a "drag," "destructive" and "the culprit" and then complaining that money was "slashed" from an entitlement program.
Because we have already called for an end to mass incarceration, but, though there has been progress, our elected local, state and especially federal officials haven't gone far enough.
As we face the rugged terrain ahead, our marching orders must be the sobering words that speak presciently from the grave of the late Coretta Scott King: "Struggle is a never ending process. Freedom is never really won, you earn it and win it in every generation."
As we witness the drug and criminal justice policies of the "greatest democracy in the world" lag behind those of an ever expanding list of other countries around the world, more and more are coming down on the right side of history.
This move could result in the release of thousands of low-level federal inmates caught up in the drug war. For a president who, hitherto, had the most conservative pardon record in recent history (e.g. in Obama's first term, he pardoned 1 in 50 applicants, while Ronald Reagan pardoned 1 in 3), such a shift is noteworthy.