michelle fields

Lewandowski's hypothesis of innocence was founded on the assertion that he acted in response to a reasonably perceived threat, within Trump's "protective bubble." The hypothesis invokes what legal theorists refer to as the law of excuses.
An apology is "a little unrealistic right now," Lewandowski said on Fox News.
Corey Lewandowski was charged last month by police in Jupiter with intentionally grabbing and bruising the arm of a reporter.
Irrational exuberance has been gushing from the anti-Trumpites since Donald Trump's loss Tuesday to Ted Cruz in the Wisconsin primary. After months of wishful thinking and unfulfilled predictions of imminent collapse, was this finally the Trump campaign's reversal of fortune?
Here's some unsolicited advice to the pitchfork and torch crowd. Grow up. Maybe you never deserved the jobs and social capital you lost in the first place. Maybe your pay now looks like what 99 percent of others' do in this country.
I sure do dislike agreeing with Donald Trump. But the billionaire bully boy is right about one thing: The manager of his neo-fascist presidential campaign, Corey Lewandowski, did not physically attack a female reporter, as all too typically hyped media reports suggested he had.
The 16 women are speaking out after Corey Lewandowski was charged with battery.
His callous comments about Michelle Fields are indicative of a much larger problem.
"If you're going to get squeezed, wouldn't you think she would have yelled out a scream or something if she has bruises on her arm?"
The story -- at least for this news cycle -- is about the campaign manager. That's never good news for the candidate. It's all supposed to be about the campaign. It used to be that way.
"I give him credit for having spirit," Trump said. "He wanted them to take down those horrible profanity laced signs. Now