Michiko Kakutani

Here is a compendium of characters Didion herself might appreciate, and one which her own family is now joining.
As a teenage girl, I used to study the photos of those otherworldly creatures and marvel at their sheer perfection -- Kathy Ireland, Christie Brinkley, Cheryl Tiegs and Paulina Porizkova, the Czech beauty who was rumored to speak five languages. Did these astonishing creatures actually exist?
Michiko Kakutani is the New York Times' Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic, and she has just named her top 10 books of 2012
Everybody has a Christmas list, I guess. I've been thinking about Christmas and the kind of stuff I'd really, really like, although I'm sure I'm not going to get it.
To me, Michiko Kakutani's latest review is emblematic of the ongoing cultural war between those adhering to the tenets of modernity: irony, cynicism, minimalism; and those who obstinately refuse to bow before these pestiferous ideals, those who honor beauty, truth and emotion. Kakutani obviously falls into the former.
There's no doubt that Kakutani can be, to use her own kind of superlative, grotesquely nasty. (She can also be overly effusive
There's a special treat for me as a reviewer when an author contacts me via Facebook, email -- or in the old days by mail -- to thank me. I don't expect it, and don't write for an author's approval, both of which make it more fun.
Brian the dog here. You know, the talking dog from "Family Guy": best-selling author, actor, television writer, movie director
In a year when so many good books were published, my own list of the best of 2010 includes some truly great books missing from the NYT collection.
What American reviewers have missed is that satire and history are coming together for the first time in McEwan's career.
Are the writers receiving the major awards and official recognition really the best writers today? Or are they overrated mediocrities with little claim to recognition by posterity?
The review spread across Twitter like wildfire. On April 12 at 5:57 p.m. the noted literary blogger Edward Champion posted
Our view is that Beatrice and Virgil is a beautifully written, unconventional and intriguing book that should be read and discussed broadly. It would be a real shame for readers to summarily dismiss this book because it disappointed a few critics.
David Shields practices what he preaches. Aphorisms in the Nietzsche manner are the coin of the literary realm that surfaces in his manifesto, Reality Hunger.
Speaking over lunch in a Midtown bistro, Michael Lewis and I had a conversation about how he became a writer, who has influenced him, and how he conjures the motivation to write.
"Americans don't like an unattractive character who is not redeemed at the centre of a novel," he says. "And maybe it's a