Michoacan

“It is a day where death is lived with joy," says photographer Diego Huerta.
Skyrocketing demand and low crop yields are a pricey combo.
I first saw the winter spectacle twenty-plus years ago when writing a story about the Monarchs for Texas Monthly magazine
The National Human Rights Commission says officers also moved bodies and tortured two people they arrested after the shootout.
We, the undersigned scientists, writers, artists and concerned citizens, call upon North American governments to preserve one of the the most extraordinary and iconic creatures on the planet.
A few months ago, we met an American filmmaker who perfectly captured a turning point in our country's drug war. His documentary film, "Cartel Land," which was recently nominated for an Oscar and won a prestigious George Polk Award, made us -- and many self-described drug war analysts -- look like opinionated snobs.
They also used their bodies to spell out "Welcome to Morelia" in Spanish.
The Mexican Federal Police, Mexico's primary public security institution, does not have a public manual on the use-of-force, meaning no current standards define when a member of the police can use force, including lethal, on another person.
Pena Nieto has faced heavy criticism over abuses by security forces since 22 suspected gang members died in an army confrontation
I first came to Mexico to visit my college girlfriend in the summer of 1984, and over the past three decades have returned numerous times to visit relatives, conduct research and travel throughout this beautiful country.
To anyone far removed from the Wall St. titans of finance, it would seem that this huge chain of ice-cream stores is a model for successful business. This was my impression until a couple of weeks ago when I read "Business in Mexico: The Peter Pan Syndrome," published in The Economist.
What we can be sure of is the enduring vitality of grassroots religious practice in Latin America beyond the pale of institutional Christianity.
I look forward to investigative reporters digging deeper into the causes and consequences of the current Michoacán crisis to help us understand the many layers that lay behind a conflict that is often reported as one between evil extortionists and a noble popular uprising.
We cannot yet speak about a new Mexican Revolution, but we can affirm with some certainty that the current uprising in Michoacán is transforming the way the Mexican state relates to its people.
Farmers wearing bulletproof vests and toting assault rifles ride in pick-up trucks emblazoned with the word "self-defense
A gruesome photo out of Mexico appears to show the bodies of seven men, propped up in plastic chairs on a busy traffic circle