Mickey Hart

“Let’s see if this year we can get 1 million people to send kind vibrations out to the universe all at once!”
Although the band comes from the '60s -- formed in Palo Alto in 1965, the Dead became a quintessential San Francisco band
Mayer and three of the surviving Grateful Dead band members -- Bob Weir, Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann -- along with Oteil Burbridge, formerly of the Allman Brothers, and keyboardist Jeff Chimenti aren't a touring nostalgia act.
50 years ended in an almost-perfect moment of collective explosion. Although the final "Fare Thee Well" Grateful Dead concert was held on July 5th at Solider Field, this incarnation of the band faded away -- for me at least -- at the close of the July 4th concert.
I don't want the Grateful Dead to mean anything beyond the moment in which I listen. I don't want the music to do anything other than unroll itself into present time, to happen, while I am lucky enough to be there.
The Grateful Dead are a band whose influence transcends their brand of epic adventurous music and army of loyal fans known as Deadheads. The California band's imprint in music belies their laid-back '60s hippie image.
"If you want to be a band, a rocker, a guy that can play music and jam with other people and be a real musician, then you've just got to go play as much as you can in front of as many people as you can any time, anywhere and live and breathe it. Put your head down and keep on swinging."
Twenty-six years ago, in June 1987, I sat in our family's blue Volvo station wagon, my six-year-old legs sticking to the vinyl seats of the car. I had tagged along with my mom to go grocery shopping, and as we pulled onto our street, a song came on the radio.
Much more than the song Jersey Shore is included with your online tip jar donation. There's over two hours of music from
As it is written: "The fields are full of dancing / Full of singing and romancing / 'Cause the music never stopped." The
By the time Mickey Hart finished his AARP convention appearance in New Orleans yesterday, we had quite literally seen his brain on drums as his brain waves were projected onto a screen by neurologist Dr. Adam Gazzaley through the magic of electrodes and computer modeling.
The music pumps and pulses while tens of thousands of fans all tune into the vibe, dancing, becoming one organism where the line between artist and audience blurs.
Back to nearly a full week of music in D.C. for me. Cheyenne Marie Mize at Black Cat, Möbius Strip and The Andalusians at Crooked Beat Records, Shpongle at the 9:30 Cluband and the list goes on...
Two hugely inspirational documentaries recently screened at the San Francisco International South Asian Film Festival (Third i) examine artists who have found themselves (quite unexpectedly) on a mission that may well keep them occupied for the rest of their lives.
Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart admits his band has always been wary of plastering its name or likeness onto products. "People
The rhythm of the conversation for how we should educate our children, which tends to focus on science, technology, engineering, and math, is missing a beat: STEM needs an A, for the Arts.
Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann, who make up the Rhythm Devils, are on the road with a gaggle of friends.
Mostly celebrating jazz's 1959 frontier, six classic albums have been re-imagined as Legacy Editions, expanding each of the originals by adding an extra disc.
Does anyone want to hear Phil Lesh pontificate about organ donation? Possibly, but most really just want to hear the Dead classics.