microplastics

Plastic may be a significant source of air pollution, concluded a new study that shows how microplastics may be carried through winds and precipitation.
New research estimates the amount of plastic particles entering your body from beer, honey, bottled water and more.
A new study gives clues on how wind can carry tiny pieces of plastics far far away.
Researchers estimate that billions of lenses are flushed each year in the U.S. -- and fragments of them might be ending up in our oceans.
It is hard to explain the way carbon, methane and ozone in the atmosphere cause the Earth to heat up. It is easier, I am telling my environmentalist friends, to understand that we will not be able to swim in the oceans.
Team Uniting Nations will be competing again this year in the fastest ocean row boat on the Pacific, "Danielle," but with
Microplastics could be harming future generations of these helpful bivalves.
Practically every kind of animal, from plankton to whales, is now contaminated by plastic. It's in the birds, in the turtles, in the fish. At the current rate, we could have 1 ton of plastics for every 3 tons of fish by 2025.
Musician and surfer Jack Johnson may seem laid back, but not when it comes to fighting plastic pollution.
Only about 1 percent of the plastic estimated to reside in the oceans has been accounted for by the five major floating garbage
Oil and its derivative, plastic, the base elements of the global economy; we return again and again to this management challenge
“From the Great Lakes to the Hudson River to Long Island Sound, our commitment to protecting and restoring New York’s waters
Two summers ago researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Superior discovered that Lakes' Superior, Huron and Erie were
Rios's background includes studying plastic debris and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the Pacific garbage patch
"Over long periods of time, big plastics degrade into smaller and smaller particles, and these may create an additional route
Both oil spills and plastic pollution kill ocean wildlife in obvious, quick ways and slow, insidious ways.